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I read somewhere that the function of golgi bodies is glycosylation and glycosidation. What is the difference between the two? I searched google but it gives complex answers.

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    $\begingroup$ “I read somewhere” is not adequate for this list. Unless you can tell us where and either cite in full we cannot assess the accuracy or examine the context of your assertion. $\endgroup$ – David Sep 22 at 19:33
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Glycosylation is a controlled process that involves a carbohydrate being attached to a hydroxyl or other functional group of another molecule. I think you meant to say glycation instead of glycosylation, and that is a random process that involves free sugars attaching to proteins.

https://www.neb.com/faqs/2015/04/10/what-is-the-difference-between-glycosylation-and-glycation

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    $\begingroup$ Welcome to Biology. Can you please add some references to support your answer? References are useful for users to verify the answer and for understanding the topic better. $\endgroup$ – WYSIWYG Sep 23 at 7:57
  • $\begingroup$ Sure, my bad. neb.com/faqs/2015/04/10/… $\endgroup$ – Om Patil Sep 24 at 12:40
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    $\begingroup$ Thanks for the reference. Please edit your answer to include it. Comments are only meant for temporary suggestions/requesting clarifications. $\endgroup$ – WYSIWYG Sep 24 at 13:25
  • $\begingroup$ The OP is specifically asking about the difference (if any) between glycosylation and glycosidation. Both terms are widely in use in the chemical/biochemical literature, if Google Scholar is anything to go by (and both terms, it would seem, refer to the formation of a glycoside). Glycation is something else. $\endgroup$ – user1136 Oct 27 at 12:24
  • $\begingroup$ here is an example of both terms being used in the title of a single article. $\endgroup$ – user1136 Oct 27 at 12:27

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