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Quick question
Monoclonal treatments in cancer require the drug attached to the antibody which then attaches itself to the neoantigen on a cancerous cell, would it be possible to
transport insulin in the same way?

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  • $\begingroup$ There are no quick questions on SE Biology, only good questions and bad questions. Good questions are on topic, explain the problem clearly, and demonstrate an attempt to research it yourself. Your question does not explain the problem, and is really focused on your own answer. Where do you wish to deliver insulin to? Why do you think it cannot reach there already? What problem is doing so going to solve? Unless you edit your question accordingly it is likely to be ruled “off-topic” as “unclear what you are asking”. $\endgroup$
    – David
    Commented Sep 30, 2019 at 18:43
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks I'll keep that in mind $\endgroup$
    – Brian
    Commented Oct 10, 2019 at 17:05

1 Answer 1

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Technically you can link two proteins together, but why would you want to do this? Antibody drug-conjugates are used to specifically target cells which can be differentiated from the healthy cells by their cancer neoantigens. This provides a high specificity of the drug delivery and also limits side effects on healthy cells.

For insulin on the other hand this is not necessary, since insulin receptors are ubiquitous thoughout cell surfaces in the body, hence supplementing insulin is enough.

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  • $\begingroup$ I think “most likely yes” is a comment rather than an answer. As the question is unclear I would suggest it comes under the category of “not all questions should be answered”. $\endgroup$
    – David
    Commented Sep 30, 2019 at 18:46

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