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After looking at a light and closing your eyes, you see an outline of the light. I was curious how my nearsightedness would come into play. I look at a light in the distance without my glasses on and close my eyes, would I be able to distinguish the light shape better than if directly looking at the light?

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Not likely. The afterimage you see when you close your eyes is an effect dependent upon which light-receiving cells in the retina (rods and cones) saw light when your eyes were open. The blurry image you saw when your eyes were open has the same size and shape as the afterimage you see when you see when you close your eyes. Because the afterimage has less detail, perhaps you would be less distracted by detail and be able to pay more attention to shape, but it seems unlikely that would noticeably help your idea of the shape.

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