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I have a home heated with wood. The humidity is currently around 30% but I'm guessing these bugs have reproduced when the humidity was higher. They really have a hard time when I see them in the basement.

I do have some wood that was a little punky. They seem to come out as soon as I start a fire in the stove, probably due to the heat?

Bug

Bug2

Approx 3cm long

Located in the eastern townships of Quebec, Canada. Any suggestion on what this is and how to treat them?

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    $\begingroup$ Welcome to Biology.SE! Please edit your post to add an estimate for the size of this insect as that can be a helpful clue for identifications. ——— You may also want to take the tour and then go through the help pages starting with How to Ask questions effectively on this site. Thanks! 😊 $\endgroup$ – tyersome Dec 5 '19 at 1:39
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    $\begingroup$ @tyersome Thanks. I modified the question with the length of the insect. I'm starting to think this may be a Sirex Woodwasp? $\endgroup$ – Alex Dec 6 '19 at 22:50
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    $\begingroup$ Great, thanks for updating — looks like you got a good answer as well! $\endgroup$ – tyersome Dec 7 '19 at 19:41
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The pictures are not entirely clear, but I’m relatively certain that it is a wood wasp of the genus Xiphydria (family Xiphydriidae). Traits that point to this is e.g. 2 pair of wings (i.e. a wasp and not a fly), narrow slender antenna, elongated body, the shape of the head sitting on a relatively long “neck”, often with light/white markings on the top and or the back of the head (which can be seen on picture 2) and often white markings along the side of the abdomen (which your insect has) The second picture also shows the relatively robust ovipositor (used to inject eggs into wood).

They also lay eggs into dead wood (usually deciduous wood) and are not uncommon to find in houses, hatched from fire wood.

The species is very hard to determine though, but X. mellipes could be one bet. This species also seem to be found in Canada, see zoology.ubc.ca/entomology. It is also similar to Xiphydria camelus which is common here in Sweden, but I’m sure if it is also found in Canada.

enter image description here
(Xiphydria mellipes from wikimedia commons

Pictures of some species can be seen at bugguide.net).

These insects are not dangerous to find inside, and they only attack dead wood in standing or fallen trees, not construction wood. They are not uncommon to find indoors (along with longhorn beetles and other wood insects) if you bring in mixed fire wood, especially if the wood wasn’t processed and dried quickly after felling. An interesting feature of these insects is that many (all?) inoculate the wood with particular fungi spores, and the fungi later function as the food for the larvae.

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    $\begingroup$ Excellent. Thank you, I think you're right with that picture; it really looks like it. White stripes on its head and abdomen. How dangerous is this to my house and what could I do to treat it? I've been searching every log in the pile but it's quite difficult. Do they rather punky wood? $\endgroup$ – Alex Dec 7 '19 at 15:38
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    $\begingroup$ It’s not dangerous at all. The adults have hatched from wood taken inside. They will try to escape outside or die inside the building. They only attack moist dead wood or strongly weakened trees. It is common to get these inside (along with eg long horn beetles) when you bring wood indoors. $\endgroup$ – fileunderwater Dec 7 '19 at 19:25
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    $\begingroup$ You should be able to find round exit holes in one of the logs. From wat I know, all wood wasps have round holes. The other option is that they hid under loose bark but that is less likely, especially if you find several of them. $\endgroup$ – fileunderwater Dec 7 '19 at 19:28
  • $\begingroup$ Thanks a lot! Very appreciated. $\endgroup$ – Alex Dec 7 '19 at 21:26
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I think that is a soldier fly.

https://animals.howstuffworks.com/insects/will-black-soldier-fly-maggots-save-humanity.htm

soldier fly

The adults do not eat or sting, only mate, lay eggs and die. The maggots are very large and awesome devourers of rotten fruit. They alternate with worms in my worm bin depending on season.

I have no idea what they are doing in your house!

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    $\begingroup$ thanks for the well-written answer, but (-1) because this doesn't appear to be the correct insect. for example, look at the difference in shape of antenna, color of legs, wing characteristics, ecology (soldier flies don't burrow in wood to my knowledge), etc. $\endgroup$ – theforestecologist Dec 7 '19 at 5:41

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