2
$\begingroup$

I knew from this website (https://www.etymonline.com/word/plasmid) that the word "plasmid" is a combination of "plasma" + "id" , where "id" means: belonging to or connected to.

But I don't understand how plasmids are connected to plasma even though they exist inside the bacteria cell cytoplasm not inside the blood/plasma

$\endgroup$
2
$\begingroup$

even though they exist inside the bacteria cell cytoplasm

Plasma has several meanings in biology. Cytoplasm is a type of plasma.

A quick trip to Wikipedia tells us that the term plasmid was first used by Joshua Lederberg in Cell Genetics and Hereditary Symbiosis. It seems that he coined the term plasmid to reconcile the many terms used to describe extrachromosomal DNA, at the time.

These discussions have left a plethora of terms adrift: pangenes, bioblasts, plasmagenes, plastogenes, chondriogenes, cytogenes and proviruses, which have lost their original utility owing to the accretion of vague or contradictory connotations. At the risk of adding to this list, I propose plasmid as a generic term for any extrachromosomal hereditary determinant. The plasmid itself may be genetically simple or complex. On occasion, the nuclear reference of the general term gene will be emphasized as chromogene...

| improve this answer | |
$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.