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I read something related to the biological effects of "mobile phone radiation". It was not as far from reality as one might expect with this topic. The context was about the acceptable distance of mobile phones to the human body. Mobile network operators specify minimal distances of some cm.

I was surprised to read that the human body actively uses electromagnetic waves in or near the frequencies used by mobile phone networks.

Is that true?
Or partially true?
Or at least plausible?



German source: https://www.diagnose-funk.org/themen/mobilfunk-anwendungen/mobiltelefone/smartphone-nicht-in-koerpernaehe-benutzen

Relevant section translated (paragraph above the image):

Human body cells also communicate via electromagnetic vibrations, such currents are measured, for example, in the case of a cardiac ECG or brain EEG. The mobile radio signals are in the frequency range of the body's own vibrations. It is therefore not surprising that electromagnetic radiation can disrupt brain waves, heartbeat and other body functions. The health risks posed by high-frequency electromagnetic fields (EMF) have been sufficiently researched and documented. Diagnosis: Radio documents this on the website www.mobilfunkstudien.org

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  • $\begingroup$ The body doesn’t use electromagnetic radiation (other than sunlight) as far as I am aware, but the reference in your original question didn’t say that, it said it could affect cells and cause them to become cancerous, like other radiation — e.g. ionizing radiation — that the body doesn’t use. Why did you remove the reference? $\endgroup$
    – David
    Feb 12 '20 at 16:45
  • $\begingroup$ @David I did not remove a reference (it's not edited at all, so there is no link to the edit history). I did not give a source, because the source is German, and pretty long. It was not about visible light or anything with shorter wavelength (ionizing). Also not in the region of longer wavelength than visible, infrared, and it was not even about heating by any lower frequency. What made it interesting was that it was not just all bullshit. There was realistic physics nearby. $\endgroup$ Feb 12 '20 at 17:38
  • $\begingroup$ @David I added my original reference $\endgroup$ Feb 12 '20 at 17:45
  • $\begingroup$ Sorry about that. Must be confusing your post with another. Anyway, I was going to make some general observations but I’ll have a glance at the original first. I can read German. $\endgroup$
    – David
    Feb 12 '20 at 19:36
  • $\begingroup$ Following the trail I ended up with an English-language paper by Yu et al. in a Elsevier journal I had not previously encountered, Science of the Total Environment. This claimed to show an effect of 4G radiofrequency radiation on rat testis and rat fertility. I can find nothing in the paper corresponding to the section you translate, or on the Diagnose: Funk report page you provide a link for. The only electromagnetic radiation that the human body uses to communicate as far as I am aware is electric currents. $\endgroup$
    – David
    Feb 12 '20 at 23:19

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