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One of the most agreed upon mechanism for evolution is natural selection.Changing environmental conditions necessities development of variations that enable the survival of that particular species.These genetically passed down variation later becomes the adaptive features which further result in development of new species.

But with development of technology we are finding newer ways to cope up with changes in the environment.Do this impact human evolution?

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"Natural selection" is a somewhat misleading term. Evolution does not need "natural" selection to occur; it only needs selection. Even the term "selection" is a bit misleading because it's often thought of as referring to the death of individuals or, somewhat more accurately, as reduced likelihood of producing offspring, due to lower fitness.

In fact, any process that gives individuals with particular genetically determined features - a reproductive advantage in a given ecological niche will drive evolution among the sub-population within that niche.

Addressing your question more directly: Suppose technology leads to people whose keyboarding talents are high having more children. If so, it will tend to drive evolution among the sub-population having access to keyboards toward genotypes having higher keyboarding talents. But if having keyboarding talents results in those individuals having less likelihood of producing children, evolution in that sub-population will be driven in the opposite direction.

IF it could be said that technology in general decouples human reproduction from "natural" influences like disease, resource availability, climate, etc., it could then be said that evolution will be less driven by those influences and more driven by, e.g., the cultural tendencies of particular sub-populations to produce more children. But that would be a gross over-simplification.

It is almost certain that changes in technology have had significant influence on human evolution. Agriculture, clothing, tool use, etc., have all had long-term consequences in human evolution.

Human culture is very complex, and separating out all the effects of technology on differential reproduction rates among sub-populations would be extremely difficult; but it's almost certain that there are such effects.

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  • $\begingroup$ You might enjoy the 2006 comedy, "Idiocracy". The premise of this movie is that while technology allowed every person to survive, the smarter people study more, have a more demanding career, and have fewer children than the stupider people who just have a lot of kids - and the hypothetical result is that in 500 years, the human population becomes much less intelligent than it is today. Of course, this is just a movie :-) $\endgroup$ – Nadav Har'El Feb 17 at 12:38
  • $\begingroup$ It was a fun movie, and I refer to it often. Just a movie, yes. $\endgroup$ – S. McGrew Feb 17 at 14:14
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Evolution is not a path towards perfection/improvement but simply a series of changes over time. Thus, as McGrew explained, technology can have an effect on what drives our evolution but cannot stop evolution: nothing can actually, because changes happen even by simple chance (see e.g. genetic drift).

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  • $\begingroup$ Arguably it is possible that technology will stop human evolution. Technology led to burning large amounts of fossil fuels, which causes global warming. If carried to an extreme, this renders the Earth uninhabitable for humans (and most vertebrate life forms). Thus technology renders humans extinct, and since extinct life forms don't evolve... $\endgroup$ – jamesqf Feb 18 at 4:10

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