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In search for any possible new treatments for COVID-19, I am of the understanding that the SARS-nCoV-2 virus may suffer deterioration at high temperatures and high humidity, to perhaps weaken it sufficiently for your immune system to be able to handle it.

Is there any research done on artificially inducing a (let's say) 40°C fever, in a controlled manner, such that brain function will not be endangered?

(Are there any fundamental biological functions that would prevent this possibility?)


Possibly Related Questions:


References:
[1] https://www.cancer.gov/about-cancer/treatment/types/surgery/hyperthermia-fact-sheet
[2] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Hyperthermia_therapy
[3] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Thermoregulation
[4] Janeways Immunobiology (book)

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  • $\begingroup$ SE Biology is concerned with the mechanisms of biological processes, and questions are generally answered by people with biological rather than medical or epidemiological expertise. It is possible, therefore, that some questions about coronaviruses relating to the recent 2019-nCoV outbreak may not receive a satisfactory answer. You may therefore wish to consult this list of reputable external sources of such information. $\endgroup$ – David Feb 22 '20 at 22:41
  • $\begingroup$ In my opinion this question is off-topic. Ostensibly it is asking for information on physiological or medical research, and in this respect it is not asking for an answer to a biological question. However the reality is that it is a question asking for discussion on a proposal for a treatment for an infectious disease. As such it falls in the category of questions of the type "I have this great idea, do you think it's right?", which can only have subjective answers. As the "great idea" it propounds is a medical treatment, it is particularly inappropriate on this list and at this time. $\endgroup$ – David Feb 23 '20 at 9:12
  • $\begingroup$ @David Ok, so what do you propose I should do? Close the question? $\endgroup$ – not2qubit Feb 23 '20 at 10:46
  • $\begingroup$ Yes I think that would be best. $\endgroup$ – David Feb 23 '20 at 12:00
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In search for any possible new treatments for COVID-19, I am of the understanding that the SARS-nCoV-2 virus may suffer deterioration at high temperatures and high humidity

If you are referring to the linked question, that is for virus in air on a dry surface. It is a test of how long the virus can survive outside of a host before it is desiccated and destroyed by the environment. It is not relevant to viral particles inside of an organism.

Are there any fundamental biological functions that would prevent this possibility?

There is little evidence that elevated body temperature has much effect on duration of infection with most common viral diseases. This is why antipyretic drugs are commonly recommended for people with viral infections.

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