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gross

This was taken in a hotel room in the Mountain View area of California. Size wise, it was pretty small, perhaps somewhere around an inch from left to right (not including antennae). My first instinct was cockroach, but, on further inspection, it doesn't look like a German or a field cockroach, as it doesn't seem to have wings. Is anyone familiar with this insect?

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  • $\begingroup$ It looks pretty difficult to identify, it's been crushed beyond recognition. $\endgroup$ – JordanTheCynic Feb 27 '20 at 18:10
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That specimen is pretty squished, but I'm guessing it's a cave cricket or spider cricket (order Orthoptera; family Rhaphidophoridae). They're very common invaders of cool damp places like basements or air conditioning units. Harmless, but can be quite startling, as most species can jump several feet in one leap.

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  • $\begingroup$ This would likely be a nymph, not an adult, right? I don't know too much about these types of things, but it was quite small (0.5-1.0 in). $\endgroup$ – Chris Loonam Feb 28 '20 at 2:59
  • $\begingroup$ Welcome to Biology.SE! You are likely to get a more positive response to your answer if you explain why your identification is correct. Specifically, please edit your answer to add discussion of key features that led you to this conclusion and supporting references or at least validated images. Without this your answer is indistinguishable from opinion. ——— You may also wish to take the tour and then consult the help pages for additional advice on How to Answer effectively on this site. Thank you! 😊 $\endgroup$ – tyersome Feb 28 '20 at 3:50
  • $\begingroup$ Assuming Alan is right about the ID (which would be problematic in any case, due to Chris' probable reaction to seeing the subject--I'm assuming the OP also did it in) the specimen may well be an adult (ALL Rhaphidophorid crickets are wingless at that stage); with a few notable exceptions (see for example Tropidischia xanthostoma on bugguide) most species of this family need to be identified from intact adult males, and much unpublished work has been done (for a preview, see the article here, the author of which has since died). $\endgroup$ – Arthur J Frost Feb 29 '20 at 19:28

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