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In this article (https://jcs.biologists.org/content/122/14/2351), especially in Figures 1 and 2, they show the expression of GFP and red fluorescence in the same tissue, and I feel like that red fluorescence is present where GFP is expressed (though weaker than where GFP is absent), but I wonder why it's not yellow? Usually, when these two are expressed in the same cells (in this case, GFP is in cytoplasm and red indicates a membrane protein), the yellow color is observed, not like this. In this article, I feel like I see some red below green if that makes sense...

If anybody knows what this means, please give me some advice! Thank you.

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These images are not typically taken using color cameras. They are taken using grayscale cameras, using filters that allow the excitation wavelengths to hit the sample and the emission wavelengths to go to the camera.

For visualization, these black and white images are often put into the red or green channel in a digital image (TVs and computer monitors make color by mixing different amounts of red, green, and blue light: RGB). If you have red and green together that shows up yellow to a human eye, but that doesn't mean any yellow light is involved: it's just perception.

If you don't see yellow in these images it's because the red and green emission were not in the same place.

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