-1
$\begingroup$

I see that scientist are sometimes trying to use so called "zinc ionophores" to get human cells to take up more zinc. Zinc is believed to sometimes reduce the ability of viruses to replicate, maybe depending on what type of virus it is. Some zinc ionophores are readily available as dietary supplements. I am thinking first and foremost on quercetin and Epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG).

  1. Is there any way to test how "open" ones zinc-channels into the cells are?
  2. Is there any research done on how much a person typically would need to consume of a certain ionophore to get a descent amount of zinc in the cells?
  3. Zinc tablets are available as dietary supplements. Is there any point in taking those if you want more zinc into your cells or is it more or less pointless if you are lacking ionophores?
$\endgroup$
1
  • 1
    $\begingroup$ SE Biology is concerned with the mechanisms of biological processes, not with medical or public health problems per se. Health advice is explicitly off-topic. Some general questions about coronavirus may be on-topic for our sister site, SE Medical Sciences, otherwise I suggest that you to consult an appropriate reputable sources for coronavirus information, some of which are listed here. $\endgroup$ – David Mar 31 '20 at 10:08
1
$\begingroup$

It is not pointless. Some zinc will get in. But only a small fraction of the zinc you take. In the short term, relatively high doses of zinc (like twice the RDA) should be okay. You could take them with green tea, which includes ionophores.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.