1
$\begingroup$

I know that so much fats running in the bloodstream could deposit in arteries, harden forming a plaque and cause atherosclerosis. But what about veins (which are formed from same types of layers as arteries) and capillaries?

I googled a bit but everything was regarding arteries.

Is it because veins have a much wider diameter than arteries that even if some fats deposit they won't clog it?

And for capillaries, they are much smaller so shouldn't they be more vulnerable to this?

In addition, I guess since one of the lymphatic vessels functions are to transport fats from capillaries in villi to bloodstream, how are they adapted to prevent deposit of fats as they carry out the transportation?

N:B I'm just an OL biology student, and also horrible at chemistry

$\endgroup$
4
$\begingroup$

I know that so much fats running in the bloodstream could deposit in arteries, harden forming a plaque and cause atherosclerosis. But what about veins (which are formed from same types of layers as arteries) and capillaries?

Wikipedia says this:

Veins do not develop atheromata, because they are not subjected to the same haemodynamic pressure that arteries are,[8] unless surgically moved to function as an artery, as in bypass surgery.

The cited study isn't freely available, but seems to have tested in rabbits by surgically modifying their blood flow and giving them a high fat diet.

As for capillaries, they are continuously remodeled, so while they do become clogged for a variety of reasons, once flow stops they're disassembled and new capillaries formed if the tissue becomes hypoxic.

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.