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I have been trying to understand the composition of plasmids used in recombinant DNA cloning, such as this: https://www.genecopoeia.com/wp-content/uploads/2020/02/pReceiver-M35-051818.pdf and I am wondering what purpose the ampicillin resistance gene has when transfected into a mammalian cell host (as it says it is for).
I understand that ampicillin resistance is used for selection in bacterial cells so that only transformed bacteria are grown as well as ampicillin being needed to prevent bacterial contamination among a mammalian cell culture, but I don't see why mammalian cells require a resistance gene to an antibiotic.

Thanks

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I think the assumption you are making is that the ampicillin resistance gene would save a purpose in the mammalian cells. It does not.

As you said, it is only use during the cloning process to select the bacteria to replicate and produce more of it.

There is a resistance gene on the vector you posted which affect mammalian cells: neomycin. In this case, once transfected into mammalian cells, you could select only the cells with the plasmid by adding neomycin the cell culture medium.

Note: neomycin selection can take some time (4-5 days) and higher dose than for example puromycin. Hope this helps!

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