0
$\begingroup$

I am confused about the structure of nucleotide of a DNA. I have seen that it has a phosphate group(PO₄³⁻) in some books but phosphoric acid(H₃PO₄) in other ones. Which one is right?

$\endgroup$
1
  • $\begingroup$ Check out this post and see if it answers your question. (biology.stackexchange.com/questions/3864/dna-as-an-acid). I will say, there is basically no circumstance in which the phosphate-group in a nucleic acid backbone will have a -3 charge, because two of the three available oxygens are utilized in the phosphodiester bond linking the sugar bases. $\endgroup$ – MikeyC Apr 29 '20 at 16:07
1
$\begingroup$

The phosphate ion has a negative formal charge and in an acidic solution its appears as a conjugate base of a phosphoric acid. That is the wey the phosphate group found in cells. The nucleotide synthesis can occur de novo or recovery ways. De novo way use phosphoribosyl pyrophosphate, which simple molecules such as amino acid, tetrahydrofolate and carbon dioxide are added.

$\endgroup$

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.