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I am trying to plant some trees which are usually native to colder climates into Subtropical climate, is there any possibility that if i plant these 20 trees saplings in winters they will grow to be a tree, due to some random genetic mutation, given all nutrients all provided to it?

Tree in Question is Deodar

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  • $\begingroup$ Mutations occur more-or-less at random and are only rarely beneficial, but the trivial answer to "any chance" is yes. ——— To improve your question I suggest you think about what you really want to know. If you are interested in whether you can get that species to grow where you live ask that on Gardening & Landscaping. If you want to know about genetic adaptation in trees, then you could try to reformulate your question for this site. However, I think you would benefit from reading some introductory material on evolution first. $\endgroup$ – tyersome May 1 at 1:19
  • $\begingroup$ I have found that when learning about a new area starting with a relatively accessible and reliable source like Khan Academy is very helpful. Wikipedia is also generally a good starting point and you can then check their references. Online platforms called MOOCs offer free (or very low cost) courses on a wide variety of subjects — two I am familiar with are Coursera and edX. Finally, textbooks with a good level of detail are also freely available online e.g. from NCBI. $\endgroup$ – tyersome May 1 at 1:21
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I think that the potential survival of your seedlings could more likely be credited to your care and management than random genetic mutations. While, of course, DNA mutations happen during cell replication, evolution at the whole-plant scale primarily occurs over the course of generations, not the lifespan of a single plant. You may well be able to get these trees to thrive in your environment with some care and love, although they may not grow as vigorously. Here is a link to a gardening website with tips on growing ceaders in a home garden, although I agree with the commenter that you'll get much better help at the Gardening and Landscaping Exchange!

Best of luck with your horticultural endeavors!

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