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I am writing a PhD research proposal and being a newbie in the field I am lost a little bit in the bacterial vegetative cell inactivation methods in foods.

I should propose two main methods to my future reseach team. The strategy is to germinate B. subtilis spores applying the high pressure, and then select one mild method to inactivate them.

My problem is to select max two most appropriate methods between:

  • Microwaves (MW)
  • Ozone (O3)
  • Pulsed electric fields (PEF)
  • Cold plasma (CP)
  • Ohmic heating (OH)
  • Ultrasound (US)
  • Ultraviolet (UV)
  • High/Low-energy Electron Beam (H/LEEB)
  • Chlorine dioxide (ClO2)
  • CO2 (HPCD, scCO2)

I need to select two methods..., I need to select only mild ones, to preserve the food taste - so I think the temperature should be <60° or max 70°... but what other criteria to take into consideration, being a newbie in this field?

Let's consider one of the method for dry foods, and another for liquids (juices, milk etc).

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  • $\begingroup$ Are the spores in a food substance? $\endgroup$ – Polypipe Wrangler May 7 '20 at 10:11
  • $\begingroup$ Yes, I edited the op $\endgroup$ – Serge May 7 '20 at 11:32
  • $\begingroup$ First thing to consider for a PhD proposal is the literature. Has someone already done this research, or something similar? Other criteria I would consider: What is the nature of the food substrate in question (solid, porous, wet, dry, cooked, raw, plant or animal based, etc.)? Could anything in a given food product interfear with or prevent any of these methods from working? Is subtilis the only spoilage organism of concern? What's the optimal stage in processing to apply your treatments? Just to name a few. $\endgroup$ – MikeyC May 7 '20 at 15:00
  • $\begingroup$ @MikeyC, there is no more details but I already gave. Let's select one method for liquids and another one for dry foods. $\endgroup$ – Serge May 7 '20 at 16:36

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