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Wont the lymphatic system eventually create antibodies that completely eliminate the virus in the body?

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  • $\begingroup$ Welcome to biology.SE! I think this question would likely attract a good answer if you include some discussion of what research you've already done. Please take the tour. It seems like there are two major assumptions coded in your question: (1) A functioning immune system should be able to clear poliovirus and (2) in the absence of virus, all damage done by a viral infection should be resolved. I encourage you to read up on how viruses evade immunity and the etiology of poliomyelitis and the human nervous system. $\endgroup$ – acvill May 9 at 15:20
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When polio causes paralysis it's because it has destroyed nervous system cells. Once those cells are destroyed they typically cannot be replaced, so it doesn't really matter what happens to the virus after that in terms of the immune system. See the Wikipedia page on polio:

In around 1 percent of infections, poliovirus spreads along certain nerve fiber pathways, preferentially replicating in and destroying motor neurons within the spinal cord, brain stem, or motor cortex. This leads to the development of paralytic poliomyelitis, the various forms of which (spinal, bulbar, and bulbospinal) vary only with the amount of neuronal damage and inflammation that occurs, and the region of the CNS affected.

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  • $\begingroup$ The post-polio syndrome may be the result of a persistent infection. Indeed most persistent viruses hide inside neurons and conversely viruses infecting neurons are often persistent (the neuron infection often happens in a minority of patients) $\endgroup$ – reuns May 9 at 12:34

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