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Can aflotoxin presence be inferred from the mild discolorotion at the middle parts of a hazelnut? For instance, how likely is it that the hazelnuts pictured below contain Aflotoxin?

P.S.: these hazelnuts were fried before packaging in a vacuum sealed plastic bag. ( I am not sure whether the color change in the middle part comes from fungal activity (e.g., aflotoxins) or from the frying process?)

enter image description here

enter image description here

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    $\begingroup$ Welcome to Biology.SE! Please take the tour and then go through the help pages starting with How to Ask questions effectively on this site and edit your question accordingly. In particular note that personal medical questions are not appropriate for this site. ——— We also encourage you to do some research on your own and then, informed by what you have learned, ask any questions you still have (ideally with references to reliable sources). Thanks! 😊 $\endgroup$ – tyersome May 16 at 20:39
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    $\begingroup$ This is not a personal medical question, sir, to put it in other words: Can aflotoxin presence be inferred from the mild discolorotion at the middle parts of a hazelnut? I was gonna edit the question but I could not see an edit option. $\endgroup$ – NerdyNerdie May 16 at 23:26
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    $\begingroup$ Apologies for being pedantic, but do you mean aflatoxin. IMO if there is any possibility whatsoever of contamination with aflatoxin, I would 'steer clear'. (For aflatoxins and their mechanism of action, see this pdf $\endgroup$ – user1136 May 17 at 23:14
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    $\begingroup$ @NerdyNerdie Your question is fine except for the question "is it safe to eat?". This very much is a question that falls under the umbrella of asking for advice that may impact your health. Please see here. As such, your post will likely be voted closed unless you remove that portion of your post. You can edit your post by clicking on edit at the bottom of your question. $\endgroup$ – theforestecologist May 18 at 3:37
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    $\begingroup$ Reformed the question accordingly. $\endgroup$ – NerdyNerdie May 19 at 16:07
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Depends on who you bought them from and how you stored them.

Molds can grow in nuts and nutmeats and produce mycotoxins (from toxin-producing strains such as aflatoxins by Aspergillus flavus). The mold is usually visible and below is picture of Aspergillus flavus growing on a nut product. Source

enter image description here

The amount of aflatoxin produced by the mold is dependent on weather conditions and storage. We can only account for or control the storage conditions. When food substances are not well preserved, fungal growth may occur, leading to the production of mycotoxins.

The pictures presented could also just be an improper storage (with no health risks). There's indication that storage of wet nuts in poorly ventilated silos increases the potential for developing kernel brown centers. Source

If these nuts were stored in improper conditions from farm to store and the farm has been associated with a breakout of Aspergillus flavus then there's chance, but slim. QA/QC and aflatoxin levels are regulated. Codex Standard 193-1995 mentions the maximum levels of aflatoxins and sampling plans.

If the nuts had mold on them and they were washed to get rid of the surface mold, they could have spores from Aspergillus flavus capable of producing alfatoxin. Aspergillus fungi can case discoloration of certain grains (rice), but that implies that you're able to see them on the product (the mold growth). The nuts in the picture seem quite clear.

In terms of where you bought the product, street vendors are at higher risk of having their products present alfatoxin problems rather than commercial enterprises, because of the location the product is sold at. Source

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