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I see "ligandable proteome", "ligandable proteins" and "ligandable targets" an awful lot.

But really I don't know what exactly the word "ligandable" means?

Is that it means, for example, "ligandable proteins" means proteins have ligands?

Thank for your help.

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  • $\begingroup$ Can you please add some references that use the terms "ligandable proteome", "ligandable proteins" and "ligandable targets"? Context helps elucidate meaning. $\endgroup$
    – acvill
    Commented Jun 11, 2020 at 14:22

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In biochemistry, ligand is usually taken to mean a substance which binds to a larger molecule such as an enzyme or other protein, thereby forming a larger complex. The study of ligand binding has been important for pharmaceuticals, particularly in ligand-based drug design.

The term ligandability (and hence ligandable) seems to have come into significant use with a paper by Edfeldt, Folmer, and Breeze in which they say:

In recent years, the term druggability has increasingly been adopted to describe the ability of a protein target to bind small molecules with high affinity; however, we believe the term ‘ligandability’ is more appropriate for this purpose. Although ligandability is a requirement for finding drugs for a particular target, it is not a guarantee that such ligands will make good drugs.

So, ligandable usually refers to the capability of a molecular target of drug design to bind small molecules. A ligandable proteome would then be a set of proteins capable of binding small molecules.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thank you for identifying the culprits. I believe there is a special place in hell reserved for such as they. $\endgroup$
    – David
    Commented May 31, 2020 at 22:06
  • $\begingroup$ Woah, I couldn't thank you enough. It really helps me a lot. Now, I get exactly what it means. $\endgroup$ Commented Jun 1, 2020 at 0:29
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Ligand is borrowed from Latin ligandus, imperative verb tense of ligo (“bind, bandage, unite”), From Proto-Indo-European *leyǵ- (“to bind”).

You can find it in many words in English, French, Spanish, i.e. Liaison which means "to link, to associate"

In chemistry, it means: An ion, molecule, or functional group that binds to another chemical entity to form a larger complex.

Ligand is a latin scientific word which means "to link, to associate, to bind together" so you can just substitute the text books for one of those words. European scientists often know 500 or 1000 latin and greek word constructions like that. Words like Astro, Geo, Bio, logos, Con, anti, which are used commonly in science.

https://www.google.com/search?q=rely+etymology&oq=rely+etymology&aqs=chrome..69i57j0.4031j0j9&sourceid=chrome&ie=UTF-8

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    $\begingroup$ So, in conclusion, "ligandable proteins" means that proteins have an ability to link, right? $\endgroup$ Commented May 31, 2020 at 7:27
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    $\begingroup$ yes that's correct $\endgroup$ Commented May 31, 2020 at 7:55

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