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When the Americas were discovered many plants were brought back to Europe. For example: potato, tomato, strawberries, chilies etc. At the same time many animals were brought to the Americas including: horses, cattle, sheep, and camels. It seems from the records that there were relatives of these animals in the Americas — for example llamas are in the same family (Camelidae) as camels. I wonder if there were relatives of these vegetables from the Americas already present in Europe or anywhere else in the old world.

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    $\begingroup$ Welcome to Biology.SE! Please take the tour and then go through the help pages starting with How to Ask questions effectively on this site and edit your question accordingly. In particular, note that asking about "related" leads to a trivial answer (Yes) since all known life on earth is related! ——— We also expect you to do some research on your own and then, informed by what you have learned, ask any questions you still have (ideally with references to reliable sources). E.g. the wikipedia article on strawberries has links to its genus, from which you can find "old world" species. Thanks! 😊 $\endgroup$ – tyersome Jun 9 '20 at 0:02
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Three of your examples: potato, tomato, and chilies, are from the genus Solanum. Along with the rest of the Solanaceae family, they are most diverse in the Americas but some species are found worldwide.

Species that would be found originally in the 'old world' from the Solanum genus and Solanaceae family include the black nightshade, bittersweet nightshade, and deadly nightshade. There is also at least one cultivated plant variously known as eggplant, aubergine, or brinjal (Solanum melongena) that is thought to have been domesticated in Asia.

The strawberry genus, Fragaria, also has species world-wide.

Of course, because all life on Earth is related, the answer to the general question "are there relatives of X found in some place" will always be "yes" as long as there is life there, it's only a matter of the extent of relation.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thank you so much, could you give any resources I can refer? $\endgroup$ – Frk Er Jun 10 '20 at 17:47
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    $\begingroup$ @FrkEr I've linked to a variety of Wikipedia pages, all of which contain pretty substantial taxonomy. If you want to get more scientific references to dig deeper than basic phylogeny you're probably best off doing it at a species level rather than systematically. You could also ask more specific, detailed questions here at Biology.SE, but you'll have to make them specific. $\endgroup$ – Bryan Krause Jun 10 '20 at 17:55

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