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Hair is protein. Does that mean that the body of a woman with hirutism is using more than usual protein to make hair and thus she needs more for building and repairing muscles?


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    $\begingroup$ Welcome to Biology.SE! Please take the tour and then go through the help pages starting with How to Ask questions effectively on this site. This seems likely to be true, but I would guess the extra amount is trivial (think about how little your hair grows each day). If you really want an answer to this I suspect [medicalscience.se] might be a better choice (please don't repost — instead request migration). ——— We also expect you to do some research on your own and then, informed by what you have learned, ask any questions you still have (ideally with references to reliable sources). Thanks! 😊 $\endgroup$
    – tyersome
    Jun 10, 2020 at 0:02

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Not significantly. Most people should have roughly 50g of protein a day, and most diets provide plenty. Larger people require a little more, and activity levels are another factor.

Hair grows fastest on the head, but when talking about "hirsutism" you are referring to body and facial hair, not head hair. Now consider shaving all the body hair, the total mass is pretty trivial, and the increase in mass per day is a fraction of a gram. Now consider the difference between a "hirsute" and "less hirsute" person, and there the extra protein requirements disappears into triviality. One extra lentil a day, not something worth measuring.

So the amount of body hair someone has naturally is not a factor that needs to be considered when calculating the protein requirements. In fact, one doesn't need to calculate protein requirements at all, unless you are on a very strict diet (in which case you will likely be under the care of a physician.)

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