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I read that the majority of humans have the muscular-skeletal potential to perform the splits that you see many gymnasts perform. The reason a living person with no flexibility training can not achieve the splits is because the person's central nervous system (CNS) automatically constricts the muscle fibers of the legs when the legs move beyond the person's normal range of motion. I read that this automatic CNS response is called the stretch reflex, and it is the CNS's way to protect the body from performing potentially dangerous movements.

So my question is: does this mean a body with a non-functioning CNS is very flexible? For example, if I could not perform splits while I was alive, could someone position my corpse into the splits before the event of rigor mortis?

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According to the science in this article: healthunify.com/why-cant-everybody-cant-do-a-split/, not really. Flexibility such as splits are only possible by lengthening the skeletal muscle fibers (in the case of splits, this includes the hamstring and iliopsoas). Which means that splits aren't solely dependent on how your CNS functions.

Furthermore, with death eventually comes rigor mortis where due to the body's chemical changes after death (lack of ATP production etc... https://biologydictionary.net/rigor-mortis/), the body becomes rigid which makes it even more difficult for a dead person to do splits than a live one without seriously damaging the dead person's body/muscles.

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