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I'm looking for a mechanism by which a cell detects a virus (probably a retrovirus) within itself, then triggers an oxidative burst in response. This should all happen within the cell itself, independent of any immune-specific cells outside. Ultimately interested in humans, but any pointers whatsoever would help.

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    $\begingroup$ Could you clarify. Do you have any reason to think such a system exists, or is this just a conjecture that such a response would seem to you an effective cellular response? $\endgroup$ – David Jul 1 at 19:06
  • $\begingroup$ @David conjecture, based on staring at one of the holes in current theories of aging and asking what would be about the right shape to fill that hole. $\endgroup$ – John Wentworth Jul 1 at 23:45
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    $\begingroup$ Better to do some research into what is actually known, I think. Try intrinsic immunity and respiratory burst. The known examples of oxidative bursts against pathogens occur within specialized organelles in neutraphils, presumably because they would be dangerous in the general cellular environment you envisage. $\endgroup$ – David Jul 3 at 14:06
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So, the cell may trigger an oxidative burst in response to pathogen (not specifically virus).

In case of retroviruses, they are hard to detect for the cell (example HIV) as they use the cell machinery for replication and can also stay in inactive latent state thereby not triggering immune response.

Hope you found your answer. Thank you and good day.

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