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For an application I need to find a cheap antigen and cheap correspondent antibody. The antigen can be literally any molecule that is cheap and potentially easy to produce and with a correspondent antibody that is cheap and easy to produce as well. I imagine this antigen will need to be a molecule that triggers very easily an immune response to result in a easy to produce antibody.
I have never worked in immunology so I don't know what system antigen-antibody to choose. I know pregnancy test are common so probably the antibody for Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is easy and cheap to produce but I don't think hCG is.
Are bigger molecules better than smaller ones as antigens? Any suggestion is helpful.

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    $\begingroup$ I am not experienced in this field but this could be helpful to you. $\endgroup$ – trinitrotoluene Jul 17 at 14:23
  • $\begingroup$ I think adding how you expect to use this will get you a better answer. For example, there are many protein purification systems that use protein or peptide tags that are recognized by antibodies, but that may not be appropriate for whatever you are planning ... $\endgroup$ – tyersome Jul 17 at 23:50
  • $\begingroup$ Really anything. I like the avidin/biotin system suggested in the link that @trinitrotoulene shared in the comment. Doesn't necessary need to be antigen/antibody but it is preferable. Interesting the protein purification, I'll have a look since those peptide tags and antibody may be common and relatively cheap. $\endgroup$ – blu potatos Jul 18 at 0:50
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A good choice is the IgG/anti-IgG pair for cheap, easy to demonstrate/work with system. E.g. Goat-IgG coupled with donkey anti-goat IgG. Just about any antibody supplier will have these.

These type of systems are the basic primary/secondary antibody bindings routinely used in immuno-assays, blotting etc. These may be mouse IgG coupled with a labeled anti-mouse IgG for example.

Reference
Wilson MS, Nie W. Electrochemical multianalyte immunoassays using an array-based sensor. Anal Chem. 2006;78(8):2507-2513. doi:10.1021/ac0518452

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