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I've seen these trees in the Bay Area in Mountain View and Fremont, and have been searching for different pine tree varieties that have wider canopies. Does anyone here know what trees these are, they are very beautiful.

enter image description here

Here is the link to the exact location where I saw them recently: https://goo.gl/maps/NSfAXZSgzypWXKqj9

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  • $\begingroup$ Welcome to Biology.SE! Identifications questions should include clear closeup photos of the organism (photos from multiple angles if possible) — for trees please include pictures of the bark, leaves/needles, and any reproductive structures. Habitat information and an estimate of the size of the organism are also helpful. Please edit your post to include this essential information. ——— You may also benefit from taking the tour and then going through the help pages starting with How to Ask questions effectively on this site. Thanks! 😊 $\endgroup$ – tyersome Jul 19 at 16:44
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For California trees, my go-to is A Californian's Guide to the Trees Among Us by Matt Ritter (Heyday, 2011). California trees can be challenging due to the extremely varied habitat and many introductions over the years.

Your trees appear to be younger specimens of Pinus pinea or the Italian Stone Pine, based on the description on page 14 in Ritter. No other conifer in the book matches better. Going to Wikipedia the description also seems to fit, in particular they mention "...in youth it is a bushy globe..." There is also good information at Kew where I found this image, which looks to be very similar to what you observed.

Of course, if you can visit the location again you can check for needles in pairs, and orange-brown scaly bark.

enter image description here

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  • $\begingroup$ Yay, this is perfect! Thank you for the book link - checking out! $\endgroup$ – foobarometer Jul 20 at 5:00

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