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Will monozygotic twins defecate at the same time if fed at the same time during the first weeks of life?

They should have the same genetics (and epigenetics) since they are monozygotic and the same environment since they live in the same house and they are just born.

I looked if metabolism (assuming it is correlated to defecating) is a genetic trait. I found this review about basal metabolism of infants but it stated that the methods aren't good and not comparable.

If there is no information for humans, what about other mammals?

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    $\begingroup$ Welcome to Biology.SE! Please take the tour and then go through the help pages starting with How to Ask questions effectively on this site and edit your question accordingly. In particular, questions should be clear and narrowly scoped (i.e. answerable in a few paragraphs rather than needing an entire book). To be clear you need to say what you mean by "metabolism". I would say that most humans have the same metabolism since with rare exceptions we all possess the same suite of metabolic enzymes. However, that has nothing to do with intestinal transit times, so you must mean something else. ... $\endgroup$ – tyersome Aug 5 '20 at 21:40
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    $\begingroup$ ... ——— Note that we also encourage you to do some research on your own and then, informed by what you have learned, ask any questions you still have (ideally with references to reliable sources). Thanks! 😊 $\endgroup$ – tyersome Aug 5 '20 at 21:41
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    $\begingroup$ At the first year of my biology teacher program in university,a professor wrote on board "x=/x"(x isn't identical to/same as x) to indicate the difference of individuals no matter how much they look the same. Monozygotic twins have identical DNA and hereditary characters, but the bodies that are formed under the guidance of the DNA aren't identical. $\endgroup$ – Harun Aug 6 '20 at 8:23
  • $\begingroup$ @Harun could you elaborate? In plantsI learned that somatic clones are assumed to be identical in any aspect since the rate of rando mutations, transposone jumpings etc. is relativley small and causes no significant difference at the start $\endgroup$ – Hachiloni Aug 6 '20 at 11:25
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    $\begingroup$ Do identical twins have the exact same gut flora? Does exposure to the same environment produce the same gut flora? Is there an element of randomness in there? $\endgroup$ – Rodrigo de Azevedo Aug 6 '20 at 12:27
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I like admire your interest.

Organisms in development rely not only on their genetic make-up but also: their environment and epigenetics (no matter how early in development).

In addition to variables other than the ones stated...

In reality if we were to test this - the twins wont eat at the same speed, expend the same amount of energy, stay the same temperature, eat the same amount, or drink the same amount as each other.

With so many extraneous variables, it leads one to believe that it is very unlikely identical humans or other organisms would defecate at the same time.

I can direct you toward some (no-pay wall) literature on the Nature/Nurture debate or Twin studies.

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  • $\begingroup$ thank you for the answer. As far as I know identical twins should have the same epigenetics and environment initially, that's why we do this kind of experiments on them. I understand from your answer that this is a too difficult to answer question. I would dig into the literature you posted. $\endgroup$ – Hachiloni Aug 6 '20 at 11:17
  • $\begingroup$ Epigenetic patterns are similar, but not the same between identical twins. Well environment is not even true, they may not always be together and so it is again, similar but not the same. It would take small amounts of carcinogens to dramatically alter results. I am sorry this isn't the answer you like. But it is the best answer available. $\endgroup$ – Andrew Aug 6 '20 at 12:04
  • $\begingroup$ I meant a too difficult to answer scientificly as there are many uncontrolable variables. Not that you answer wasn't a good fit for my question. Apologies if I wasn't clear $\endgroup$ – Hachiloni Aug 6 '20 at 15:19
  • $\begingroup$ Not too difficult to answer scientifically. Even if we tried as stated above in my answer - it is highly unlikely. Does that not answer your question? It does. But it's not the answer you wan? You cannot get SE members to solve arguments for you. $\endgroup$ – Andrew Aug 7 '20 at 22:47
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They should have the same genetics (and epigenetics) since they are monozygotic and the same environment since they live in the same house and they are just born.

https://childrenswi.org/medical-care/fetal-concerns-center/conditions/infant-complications/twin-to-twin-transfusion-syndrome

If untreated, the survival rate for TTTS twins is approximately 10 to 15 percent.

So in your scientific opinion, that whole website and condition is just pure garbage, and the parents and doctors are making it all up, right?

Because of course twins always have the exact same metabolism?

Do you have the scientific integrity to admit your conclusion here?

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  • $\begingroup$ I think I mentioned I'm not a animal biologist but a plant scientist so I don't know all the possible syndromes. Obviously this condition will make identical twins non-identical and therefore they are excluded from my question. Your comment seems agressive. And, from the comments and answers I got this sites seems too agressive and oversensitive to be a good place to ask questions $\endgroup$ – Hachiloni Aug 9 '20 at 10:02

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