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T-cell co-stimulatory and co-inhibitory molecules (collectively named co-signaling molecules) play a crucial role in regulating T-cell activation, subset differentiation, effector function and survival. Following recognition of cognate peptide-MHC complexes on antigen-presenting cells by the T-cell receptor, co-signaling receptors co-localize with T-cell receptors at the immune synapse, where they synergize with TCR signaling to promote or inhibit T-cell activation and function.

I'm not sure I understand the second sentence. The language is a little confusing to me. Does it mean that after a TCR binds to a peptide-MHC complex, other TCRs present on the cell gather around that TCR? Does it mean that one TCR can bind more than one peptide-MHC complex (which, as far as I understand, isn't true)?

Here's my paraphrase of this sentence:

Following recognition of a cognate peptide-MHC complex on an antigen-presenting cell by a T-cell receptor, co-signaling receptors co-localize with (other) T-cell receptors at the immune synapse, where they synergize with TCR signaling to promote or inhibit T-cell activation and function.

Is it correct?

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Does it mean that after a TCR binds to a peptide-MHC complex, other TCRs present on the cell gather around that TCR?

Yes. Other TCRs bind other MHC/antigen complexes and they all cluster together, forming an immunological synapse.

Does it mean that one TCR can bind more than one peptide-MHC complex (which, as far as I understand, isn't true)?

No. TCR:MHC bind 1:1.

Your final paraphrase is correct.

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