9
$\begingroup$

I know it sounds like a stupid question. Obviously, tRNAs and rRNAs, for example, form loops and could therefore be considered as dsRNAs... but are they really considered as such?

Are there examples of RNAs, in eukaryotic cells, that could be considered exclusively as dsRNAs, or are dsRNAs considered as unique to certain viruses?

Thanks in advance for your help. I couldn't find a clear answer to that question in my textbooks and on the internet, so I hope you can help.

$\endgroup$
11
$\begingroup$

Yes dsRNAs are present in eukaryotic cells and regulate various biological processes.

These nucleic acids are also present in nucleus and regulate mitosis. Altering this nucleic acid could even lead to cell death.

(Reference: https://pubmed.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/25504323/)

| improve this answer | |
$\endgroup$
3
$\begingroup$

I think that one can say that, excluding examples of the type mentioned together with transient complexes involving miRNAs, the fruitless Google searches tell their own story.

The scientific basis for thinking this is that low concentrations of dsRNA are thought to be perceived by the organism as an indication of an infecting RNA virus, and trigger the interferon response.

Of course in biology one only has to open one’s mouth and a black swan will appear.

| improve this answer | |
$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.