1
$\begingroup$

It's known that ionizing radiation such as X-ray and $\gamma$-ray, cause DNA damage, specifically double strand break. Why is it so? I mean, why not single strand break, why not pyrimidine dimer?

$\endgroup$
6
$\begingroup$

Ionizing radiation does cause single-strand breaks and other kinds of DNA lesions that are not double-strand breaks. However, double-strand breaks are the most difficult to repair and are thus the most likely DNA damage type to result in mutation and / or cell death. See Fig 1. from DNA damage response signaling pathways and targets for radiotherapy sensitization in cancer:

Figure 1 from "DNA damage response signaling pathways and targets for radiotherapy sensitization in cancer" DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation. The major types of DNA damage induced by IR include base and sugar damage, single-strand breaks, double-strand breaks, clustered DNA damage, and covalent intrastrand or interstrand crosslinking

$\endgroup$

Your Answer

By clicking “Post Your Answer”, you agree to our terms of service, privacy policy and cookie policy

Not the answer you're looking for? Browse other questions tagged or ask your own question.