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Isn't genome size considered to be the number of base pairs present in DNA? So what is the difference between the mutation per base pair and mutation per genome? Are they similar or different?

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  • $\begingroup$ I assume you read both terms somewhere? Often, context supplies meaning. If you could directly quote the source of each term, you would likely get a good answer. $\endgroup$
    – acvill
    Dec 23 '20 at 17:20
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They are different normalizations of the same number. It's the question of whether you want to know how many mutations can be expected at a single position in a genome, or whether you want to know how many mutations occur across the entire genome.

See wikipedia, for instance:

There are several natural units of time for each of these rates, with rates being characterized either as mutations per base pair per cell division, per gene per generation, or per genome per generation.

Mutations per genome is the number of mutations per base pair times the number of base pairs in the genome (plus mutations that do not correspond to base pair substitutions, though they are usually ignored in these measurements).

E.g., $10^{-9}$ mutations per base pair in a genome of 3 billion base pairs correspond to $3$ mutations per genome.

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    $\begingroup$ not sure why this answer was downvoted/flagged. it's a pretty straightforward topic, not sure why a link is needed. $\endgroup$ Dec 22 '20 at 22:07

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