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Unclear to me what this means:

"Objective The biological heterogeneity of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) makes prognosis difficult. We translate the results of a genome-wide high-throughput analysis into a tool that accurately predicts at presentation tumour growth and survival of patients with HCC."

Reference

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"At presentation" means "when a symptom/diagnosis is observed/noted by a medical professional".

In the paper you cite, they are doing microarrays on biopsied tumor tissue. "At presentation" here effectively means "at biopsy", at which time that a patient is diagnosed with hepatocellular carcinoma. It's important to note that their sampling is based on presentation time because tumor age at presentation is not going to be the same for everyone - some patients may "present" with symptoms and be diagnosed when a tumor is relatively new, others may present when a tumor is advanced. Presentation is both a convenient and clinically relevant time point - it's the earliest time a prognosis can be offered.

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"Presentation" is the event where the patient first visits the doctor.

For example, "the patient presented with yellowing skin and complaining of abdominal pain".

The paragraph you have doesn't make this clear, they assume you have already had your genome sequenced prior to visiting the doctor, who looks at the result, uses this tool and predicts what is likely to happen to you and your cancer based on your DNA.

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  • $\begingroup$ This answer is a bit wrong; this is not based on prior genome sequencing. They're doing microarrays on biopsied tumor tissue and identifying particular genes for prognostic benefit. Presentation is when the patient is biopsied and diagnosed. $\endgroup$ – Bryan Krause Jan 22 at 18:29
  • $\begingroup$ Thank for polite comment, Your answer covers it so I will delete mine tomorrow. $\endgroup$ – Polypipe Wrangler Jan 22 at 22:04

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