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A nucleus can have multiple nucleoli. But are there any constraints on the number of nucleoli in a nucleus?

  1. Can cells of individuals of different species have a different number of nucleoli?
  2. Can cells of different individuals of the same species have a different number of nucleoli?
  3. Can cells of different types have a different number of nucleoli?
  4. Can different cells of the same type have a different number of nucleoli?

I've found snippets of information implying the number of nucleoli is fixed per species, but none authoritative enough to stoke my doubts.

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I'll directly go to your fourth question, as all of them can be answered with a yes. This rather old mouse paper already got to the point. Sadly, only the abstract is freely available. Briefly, the number can be variable in the smallest unit you are interested in, the cell type. From the abstract:

The distribution of the number of nucleoli in many diploid cells exhibited a mode of two or three nucleoli per nucleus, and a range from 1 to 6 nucleoli.

In the paper, there are histogram of different cell types of mouse and all of them seem to be variable in their number of nucleoli.

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  • $\begingroup$ Exactly what I was looking for, thanks! $\endgroup$ – David Cian Feb 7 at 19:11

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