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The title says it all. If you disinfect something more regularly, aren't you just selecting for bacteria which are most robust to that method of disinfection? I've heard it said about some medications that they "can't cause antibacterial resistance". In particular I've read that this is claimed about topical benzoyl peroxide in the context of skincare. Do these claims have any weight to them?

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It is possible to select bacteria in vitro, with some help, to withstand 50 g/L (5% v/v) of isopropanol. According to this paper, bacteria at hospitals in Peru have a variable but increased resistance to isopropanol. (That study was preliminary, however) Since bacteria can produce isopropanol themselves, some degree of resistance is very plausible. Even so, the fundamental nature of 70% isopropanol's attack on the membrane makes it hard to defeat. Anything is possible in biology, but the more proper the application of disinfectant in terms of exposure time and concentration, the less plausible the selection of resistant species or strains from the bacterial community will become.

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