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I'm looking for examples in the human body which show periodicity, more precisely, I'm looking for examples of oscillating reactions that occur in the human body which can be modelled using the Hamiltonian of the harmonic oscillator. for example, as someone mentioned to me before, the circadian rhythm is controlled by the oscillation of protein concentration. I wanted to know if there are some examples from biologists perspective?

I want to read more about it, and I will be grateful to hear more examples so I can look for information about it online or if anyone could refer me to some reading material regarding this subject.

Thank you very much for your time and attention.

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    $\begingroup$ it would be helpful to know more about the hamiltonian of the harmonic oscillator, what it is traditionally used to model, why you would want to find such a mechanism, and any other relevant data. you don't normally start with a model and then go around looking for systems; you usually start with systems and try to figure out models that might match them. $\endgroup$ Mar 10, 2021 at 4:17
  • $\begingroup$ @MaximilianPress thank you for your comment. I'm sorry for expressing myself so poorly, I edited my post, I hope it's more clear now. $\endgroup$ Mar 10, 2021 at 8:57
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    $\begingroup$ This is a very broad question since a) periodic changes are not necessarily oscillations in Hamiltonian sense (like circadian rhythms, which is hard to describe as oscillations - just like roration of Earth around the sun), b) non-linear oscillations are not necessarily Hamiltonian and/or harmonic (like those describing the dynamics of a heart). It might be too technical to discuss in the biology community, but this is something you should keep in mind. Perhaps, you could post a parallel question on phsyics exchange, since it borders on biophysics. $\endgroup$ Mar 10, 2021 at 9:23
  • $\begingroup$ Mathematical physiology by Keener could be one place to look at - the chapter on wave propagation certainly has oscillators in it, but there shoudl be more material spread over the book: books.google.fr/books/about/… $\endgroup$ Mar 10, 2021 at 11:04
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    $\begingroup$ en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Neural_oscillation $\endgroup$ Mar 11, 2021 at 15:11

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