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On the wiki page for proto-cadherins, they write, "The cytoplasmic domain also mediates intracellular retention, a property which distinguishes the clustered protocadherins from the related classical cadherins." citing the following source.

Unfortunately, I was unable to find much anything to go off. Anyone know off-hand what this terminology is referencing?

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Based on this line from the paper you linked, it seems like they are using intracellular retention to refer to proto-cadherins being taken up in to the cell via endocytosis.

It is possible that the effects of deleting the intracellular domain might be a result of loss of an organelle retention signal located in the cytoplasmic domain of the protein and/or a decrease in endocytosis of the protein accumulated in the membrane.

This paper also refers to intracellular retention of cadherins in the context of endocytosis of proto-cadherins: https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3216661/

Based on this information, the quote from the Wikipedia page ("The cytoplasmic domain also mediates intracellular retention, a property which distinguishes the clustered protocadherins from the related classical cadherins.") seems to be saying that the cytoplasmic domain regulates proto-cadherins on the cell membrane being taken back up into the cell via endocytosis, hence retaining them intracellularly.

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  • $\begingroup$ Thanks, man. My understanding of your answer is that for proto-cadherins downregulation is via the endocytosis process. As to what happens after endocytosis? Lysosomal degradation? So how would this compare to the up-and-down regulation of non-proto-cadherins? What benefits arise from one mechanism relative to the other? $\endgroup$ Mar 10 at 15:57
  • $\begingroup$ I'm not too sure, I'd have to do some reading. It might be worth asking another question about that to get a good answer. $\endgroup$
    – Brad0440
    Mar 11 at 9:02

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