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I am interested in the multifactorial process about infectious diseases of the lower respiratory system and their progression to a skin infection. Possible agens are zwitterions, viruses, fungi, amoebas, bacteria and/or parasites.

Zwitterions

Small protein segments, much unknown but their importance is much greater than known.

Viruses

Parvovirus B19

  • Example of a case: 5 children develop a bright red rash on the face and turns violet after a few days and then disappears. Then maculopapular rash appears on the trunk, buttocks and extremities. It soon fades from the trunk but persists on the thights and forearms. Two children have also had a slight fever and a sore throat, but all were not terribly sick. What is the genetic material of the most likely causative agent?
  • It is a skin infection. Not so severe. Little upper respiratory infection but not necessary caused by the agent. Infects many so spread probably by respiratory droplets. **But how a respiratory infection can lead to a skin infection?*

Bacteria

....

Amoebas

...

Fungi

....

Parasites

...

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closed as unclear what you're asking by MattDMo, kmm, AliceD, rg255, Chris Sep 21 '16 at 7:29

Please clarify your specific problem or add additional details to highlight exactly what you need. As it's currently written, it’s hard to tell exactly what you're asking. See the How to Ask page for help clarifying this question. If this question can be reworded to fit the rules in the help center, please edit the question.

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    $\begingroup$ I don't have the time to answer this now, but you're thinking about it just in the context of the question which is limiting. Check out Mycoplasma pneumoniae. $\endgroup$ – Atl LED Aug 23 '13 at 3:10
  • $\begingroup$ So, my question is are we limiting ourselves to the example case, which seems to have nothing to do with respiratory infection (unless it's measles, but the statement "not terribly sick" somewhat precludes this, and the measles rash turn dark brown, not violet). Or are we just generically asking the question "how can a respiratory infection lead to a skin infection." which is very different. I also don't see what your attempt to answer the question has been. $\endgroup$ – Atl LED Sep 19 '16 at 14:18
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    $\begingroup$ cf. Parvo, Erythema infectiosum, Rubella, and viremia. You're going to have to give me more before I'm enticed to come back. $\endgroup$ – Atl LED Sep 19 '16 at 14:31
  • $\begingroup$ Have you determined the the most likely causative agent first? This still feels like a homework question that hasn't been addressed fully. I've given you 4 different respiratory infections that causes rashes (M. pneumoniae, measles, parvo, and rubella). Start with figuring out the causative agent, then ask the question, "How does [P] pathogen cause a rash?" If you show your effort in answering that, and have trouble, I'd be happy to come back and help. $\endgroup$ – Atl LED Sep 19 '16 at 14:38
  • $\begingroup$ Perhaps we should continue the discussion in chat? $\endgroup$ – Atl LED Sep 19 '16 at 14:46
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One might argue that since replication takes place in erythroblasts (Brown, Anderson, & Young, 1993), that it's not actually a respiratory infection either. Fluids are simply more hospitable to the virus and more transmissible.

As for the rash, perhaps it is because the P antigen receptor that erythrovirus uses to infect erythroblasts is also expressed on endothelial cells, like those in skin (and alveolar) capillaries .

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