Questions tagged [action-potential]

A rapid change in the membrane potential of excitable cells such as neurons and muscles; this usually involves a steep rise (depolarization) followed by a steep fall in membrane potential (repolarization). The cell subsequently enters a short refractory period (hyperpolarized state) during which it cannot generate another action potential.

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2answers
265 views

Why does resting potential not become continually more negative?

(Firstly, I know this is similar to other questions, but I have read those answers and they do not really cover this topic). My understanding of resting potential: action potential is not being ...
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1answer
304 views

What is the mechanism by which myelination reduces the capacitance of the axon membrane?

There are two mechanisms that have been proposed to me. 1) Layering of Schwann cell membrane with conducting fluid between the layers is analogous to several capacitors in series. Since capacitance ...
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1answer
4k views

Why does an electric shock contract the muscle?

From what I understand, the electrical impulse in our nerve cells is not made of electrons, but of ions that move from different environments with different concentrations, which is totally not ...
7
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2answers
2k views

Can a single axon propagate multiple simultaneous action potentials?

I have not been able to locate any research that indicates whether a single axon of a neuron or nerve cell can conduct multiple simultaneous (i.e. spatially separate) action potentials. I am aware ...
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2answers
542 views

What material fills the synaptic cleft? Is it water?

The synaptic cleft is the gap between the pre-synaptic and post-synaptic neurons, and neurotransmitters are transferred between the neurons within this region. What substance exits in this space, is ...
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2answers
185 views

How do firing patterns arise from the activity of many ion channels?

In his answer to another question, Bryan Krause says: Ion channels don't exhibit any firing patterns: neurons exhibit firing patterns that depend on all the channels present [...]. I understand ...
11
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1answer
798 views

Purpose of K+ channels in action potential

I understand that they serve to repolarize the neuron after the Na+ influx. What I don't understand is why this is important. Meaning, let's say all the K+ channels disappeared. So now the ...
4
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2answers
753 views

Could an action potential produce few or more neurotransmitters based on the stimulus received?

I reckon that if you would be able to widen the AP width, it would produce more neurotransmitters in that larger time interval. Is that correct? Or does the neuron have a standard amount of ...
5
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0answers
129 views

How to measure Na/K channel activation at the membrane level?

Assume that there are two different signals occurring on the ECG - during depolarization and repolarization in the standard ECG. I was advised not to use the standard ECG in measuring the exact ...
3
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1answer
93 views

Neuronal membrane resting potential for large cells

I'm reading Medical Physiology by Boron and Boulpaep (a really terrific book). In the chapter Electrophysiology of the Cell Membrane, section Membrane Potential Is Generated by Ion Gradients, Not ...
2
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2answers
662 views

Why is the resting membrane potential of excitable tissue not affected by the extracellular sodium concentration?

I know that the resting membrane potential for excitable tissue (eg, nerve) is primarily determined by the electronegative difference between the inside and the outside of the membrane for potassium ...
2
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1answer
5k views

Why is pericardium muscle repolarizated earlier than endocardium? [closed]

I was reading about heat muscle contraction and I read: The endocardium depolarization happens earlier than pericardium , but pericarduim repolarization happens earlier, therefore the T wave in ...
4
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1answer
607 views

Why do the size of the phase 1 notch vary among cardiac cells?

The size of the phase 1 notch varies among cardiac cells. It is prominent in myocytes in the epicardial and midmyocardial regions of the left ventricular wall and in ventricular Purkinje fibers. ...
2
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1answer
2k views

Why is extracellular measurement of action potentials so different from intracellular?

I had read in a paper that present a low noise amplifier the following: "...This level of input signal is larger than both typical action potentials (<500μV) and local field potentials (<5 mV). ...
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0answers
60 views

Functional role of the myelin sheath [duplicate]

One usually reads that the functional role of the myelin sheath is being a good insulator, accelerating the speed of action potential propagation along the myelinated axon. I tried to understand this ...