Questions tagged [bacteriology]

A subdivision of microbiology dedicated to the study of bacteria.

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1answer
107 views

Theoretical question: Would immune cells that produce blue light be an effective and better alternative to inflammation? [closed]

It's well known that blue light is effective against a wide range of bacteria (type "antibacterial blue light" into Google for starters). This article (https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/23009190) ...
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What medium is the bacteria used to synthesize B12 sourced from?

Would that be from water, soil, plants, funguses,...? I asked the question in Quora but that, at the time of posting in this forum, haven't been very helpful. I also have searched for the ...
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1answer
121 views

Are there any bacteria, virus or mold that can withstand ozone?

Ozonation is often promoted as one of the most effective disinfection procedures. There are numerous reports on how ozone effectively kills bacteria and molds, and disarms viruses within seconds due ...
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3answers
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Why is cancer more lethal than (hypothetical)infections?

I am a computer science student and I'm interested in algorithmic aspects of cancer! Once I heard that there exist more bacteria in human body than our own cells, I wondered that why bacteria, which ...
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943 views

Difference between bacteria and bacteroids?

During nodule formation Rhizobium is converted to bacteroids. What's the difference between them?
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563 views

What really causes the toxicity of wrongly-thawed meat?

(Note: I've seen multiple related questions over at Cooking.SE, but I'm looking for a scientific explanation, not cooking advice!) I've been researching this for a couple of hours but the more I read,...
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1answer
41 views

Proteins that cannot form biofilm?

I am trying to build a machine learning training set for bacterial protein sequences that form biofilm, and that cannot. I collected the positive sequences from the GO ontology website but for ...
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2answers
155 views

Why are sugars like mannose expressed on the outside of eukaryotic cell membranes?

Bacteria are able to adhere to sugars (e.g. mannose) on the exterior of eukaryotic cells, leading to infection and disease. Why have eukaryotes not evolved so as to dispense with sugars on their cell ...
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1answer
57 views

Possible for bacteria to burst container?

This is kind of a thought experiment, but are there any conditions under which bacteria could multiply enough to burst the container they're in? Thoughts so far: Bacteria often need oxygen to ...
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Do microorganisms contain water?

This may sound a bit strange question, but I am very new to biology. I would like to ask that do microorganisms like viruses, bacteria, amoebas, etc also contain water, as every living thing contains ...
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224 views

What is intercalary mitosis in bacteria?

According to Wikipedia, in vegetative reproduction fragmentation takes place, and Spirogyra simply undergoes intercalary mitosis to form new filaments. How is 'intercalary' defined in a bacterial ...
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How would infection of mosquitos with sterilizing bacteria have any effect?

According to this article from the New York Post, the US just approved the mass release of male mosquitos infected with a bacteria that sterilizes them. The idea, according to the article and some ...
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Can bacteria only thrive in agar solution? [closed]

In petri dish, agar is most commonly used for culturing bacteria. So is there any other easily obtainable food sources for culturing bacteria.
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Exclusion Limit and permeability of outer membrane

According to this textbook: P aeruginosa, for example, which is extremely resistant to antibacterial agents, the outer membrane is 100 times less permeable than that of E coli.[pg.no 27] and then ...
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106 views

Serial dilutions

A student wants to make serial dilution of a sample. She starts with a 1mg/ml sample and 10 tubes, (labelled 1-10) each containing 2 ml buffer. The student puts 1ml of sample solution into tube 1 ...
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2answers
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What are the (correct) terms for these flagella-arrangements?

I came across the following diagrams depicting two kinds of arrangement of flagella over cells. Now according to my (very unreliable) school textbook, the arrangements are termed as: A - ...
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3answers
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Why does no one get vaccinated against plague in Europe?

I've read on Wikipedia that only people who work with Y. pestis and people in 3rd world countries get vaccinated against it: Since human plague is rare in most parts of the world, routine ...
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Blue light in a fridge. Is it really beneficial or just marketing?

Recently while visiting a shop with electronics I saw a fridge with a huge advertisment sticker going more or less like this: There's blue light source in this fridge so there will be less bacteria ...
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2answers
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Hand-washing resistant bacteria. Will they evolve one day?

I know that soap kills bacteria by dissolving their membrane. But it is not 100% effective. A small portion of bacteria which survive replicates and I have to wash my hands again. Will this cycle ...
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1answer
398 views

Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms grows stronger after 95 % ethanol treatment

I used 95 % ethanol to disinfect Pseudomonas aeruginosa biofilms from titanium discs and compared it to disinfection with water and hydrogen peroxide. The strange thing was that when examining in SEM, ...
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1answer
53 views

What if Staphylococcus Aureus are extinct? [closed]

What if Staphylococcus Aureus are extinct? Can it be good for human or bad for human? Thanks for your answer in advance.
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Would the microgravity "shape-shifting" bacteria effect have anything to do with bacteria growing in a host?

Phys.org's news article Why bacteria 'shapeshift' in space describes a recently published study Phenotypic Changes Exhibited by E. coli Cultured in Space, Zea Luis, Z. et al, 2017, Frontiers in ...
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Cyanobacteria: Gram negative or Gram positive?

My (school) textbook states that cyanobacteria ("blue-green algae") are Gram positive (no references provided). They mention this at several points over the chapter we're doing so it doesn't look like ...
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1answer
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How likely will 2 normal bacteria "attack" each other if they infect the same parts of your body?

I read this interesting article online about how deadly bacteria are known to attack other deadly strains of bacteria. https://www.google.com.sg/amp/s/phys.org/news/2013-02-deadly-bacteria-remarkable-...
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Is it inevitable that antibiotics will become useless in the future due to bacteria immunities?

Antibiotics are developed in an ever smaller amount due to the difficulties of discovering new ones. Bacteria, on the other hand, keep "finding" more ways to render antibiotics ineffective, and they ...
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Role of non-inflammation in H.Pylori positive people

Quoted from Saudi J Gastroenterol. 2009 Jul; 15(3): 201–207 publication : Approximately 50% (over 3 billion) of the world populations are known to be infected with Helicobacter pylori, mainly in ...
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Why do soil bacteria produce nitrous oxide as a result of anhydrous ammonia fertilizer application?

The NPR article and 4 minute audio news item Can Anyone, Even Walmart, Stem The Heat-Trapping Flood Of Nitrogen On Farms? discusses unexpected contributions of greenhouse gasses from the manufacture ...
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Using Transduction to reverse Antibiotic Resistance?

Is it possible to use reverse transduction to reverse antibiotic resistance. Since antibitiotic resistance is causee by transduction of the F factor, is it possible to induce a F+ non antibiotic ...
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3answers
543 views

Could plasmids and conjugation mechanisms be used against antibiotic-resistant bacteria? [closed]

I'm surprised no one has mentioned something like this. Plasmids are often exchanged between bacteria, sometimes through conjugation. In particular, conjugation could be considered an "open-port&...
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1answer
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What type of Bacteria?

I did some tests to a bacteria colony and I observed the following: First of all let's start from the shape and after that we move on to the chemical tests that I did to them: Form: Circular Colour: ...
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How dirty are bugs? And is it okay if they touch food?

Sometimes I see people throw out an entire drink or bowl of food because a small bug was in it. Are they justified in doing this? Is there enough bacteria on common species of bugs (like ants, flies, ...
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531 views

Bacteriophages and their role in genetic editing? [closed]

I know how plasmids and restriction enzymes work to change the dna of a bacteria cell, but I do not really understand how a bacteriophage works to edit the genome of a cell. Is it related to crispr ...
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What chemicals will kill P1 Phage but not E. coli?

I'm working with E. coli and P1 Phage. I'm wondering if there is some chemical agent that will kill or disable P1 but leave E. coli untouched? It is not enough to just prevent infection. It must ...
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How quickly do bacteria lose genes after selection has been removed? [duplicate]

If bacteria are subject to a biocide and then that biocide is removed from the population, how quickly will they lose that gene that encodes for resistance?
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Troubleshoot bacteria fixation for SEM

I fixate bacteria on titanium coins for 1 h i 2.5 % Gluaraldehyde. Then wash 3 times in ddH2O. Then 10 min in each solution of Ethanol 10 %, 30 %, 50 %, 70 % 90%, 100%. Finally soaking in HMDS in 15 ...
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1answer
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What does it take to start producing(cultivating) probiotics?

Is there a DIY way? Is it possible to make a bacteria strain from scratch based on an existing one ? (for example lactobacillus reuteri).
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Are bacteria incapable of producing cytokines such as interleukins?

As far as I understand, bacteria cannot produce cytokines such as interleukins. However, I have not read an explanation as to why they cannot. Perhaps it has to do with an evolutionary limitation. Yet,...
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Why do bacteria eat enamel?

What causes tooth decay bacteria or acids? I've been told that it is a combination of both but why would bacteria eat enamel? There are much easier supplies of protein for bacteria to munch through (...
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Any studies on the effects and/or benefits of oil pulling? [closed]

A friend recently recommended me a process called 'oil pulling' for my teeth as I am struggling with my dental health at the moment. The process involves using a tablespoon of some kind of vegetable ...
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what are the ethical considerations when preparing a bacterial culture for testing antibiotic resistance? [closed]

I cannot think of any ethical issues associated with preparing a bacterial culture to test antibiotic resistance. The bacteria I am using is Bacillus Megaterium so its not pathogenic. Thanks in ...
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Is this a bacterial colony?

On the physics StackExchange site people are trying to figure how and why these branching structures formed. The two questions can be found here and here. The latter had no cooling fans and was ...
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What sort of biofiltration is best for a small, portable, biofiltration unit?

I've been exploring the idea of a system to allow re-use (drinking) of RV greywater, or at least the freedom to dump in storm drains (I think the requirements are looser about this, but it still has ...
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1answer
1k views

Difference between bacterial chlorophylls

I understand that bacterial chlorophylls are of the form a, b, c and d. But i read in my textbook about pigments like bacterio purpurin and bacterio viridin; are they a part of the 4 types of ...
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Are bacterial RNA polymerases distributed evenly throughout the cell or localized?

Bacterial cells aren't internally compartmentalized with membranes (like eukaryotes). This naturally leads to an image of a homogeneous interior, but bacterial cytoplasm isn't homogeneous. Case in ...
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Can bacteria be considered carnivores? [closed]

Ok carnivores are "animals that eat other animals," so what are bacteria that eat animals? Or are they just not important
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What is an inclusion forming unit?

What is inclusion forming unit load? I found it when reading this article. What does this measure and what information can be gained form it? Does this represent the amount of bacteria within a ...
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1answer
227 views

Lactobacillales vs LAB (Lactic acid bacteria)

As far as I understand bacteria of order Lactobacillales are all LAB (Lactic acid bacteria). So often "Lactobacillales" and "LAB" are used interchangeably. But I also thought that this is not the ...
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2answers
247 views

Why are aminoglycoside antibiotics particularly effective for aerobic gram negative bacteria?

Aminoglycosides are short chains of sugar molecules with some -OH groups substituted with amine groups. As far as I understand they function by causing bacterial ribosomes to misread RNA and create ...
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1answer
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Do mutations in one bacterial strain have the same effect in other strains within the same species?

I would assume so, since they are the same species after all. I am asking this because I am doing a bioinformatics project for school and I cannot find any protein mutations for the specific bacterial ...
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Advantages and disadvantages of sporulation compared with competence in bacteria?

Why do bacteria have both of these mechanisms to deal with the same environmental stress: nutrient deprivation? In a culture exposed to this condition, often both competent cells and sporulated cells ...

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