Questions tagged [biochemistry]

The study of chemistry within the scope of biology: the compounds that occur and the reactions involving them in living organisms.

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Why isn't aluminium involved in biological processes? [migrated]

There are so many biological processes which are dependent upon ions of lighter metals (upper part of periodic table) such as K+, Na+, Mg2+ and even early transition elements (Fe, Mn, Cu, Ni) but I ...
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Meaning of units in ELISA based tests?

For some ELISA based antibody tests (e.g. h-tTg antibody test), labs report units as RU/mL or U/mL. Also different labs have different cut off (normal range) values. I understand that different kit ...
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In the context of lab work, what's the difference between “urea nitrogen” and “blood urea nitrogen”?

Are these the same thing? Or is it possible that urea nitrogen can not be from blood?
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About DNA polymerization

What type of polymerization process performs DNA, are there ant other types than adittion and condensation polymerization?
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How are humanized antibodies made?

What kind of antigen is used to provoke/induce an immune response if you are trying to make therapeutic humanized antibodies for cancer and alzheimer's disease? For example, if you wanted to make an ...
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What enzyme or bacteria could dissolve plastic?

What enzyme or bacteria could dissolve plastic aside from acetone? Preferably, low-cost and environmentally friendly. Any suggestions would be helpful. I'm targeting for thin plastic (low-density ...
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What is the subcellular location of synthesis of non-essential amino-acids?

What is location of non-essential amino acids synthesis in a cell? Is it some specific organelle? And what is the gene driver behind this? I thought the whole point of DNA is coding for how to ...
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How can I get the yield of my purified immunoglobulins?

In order to get the yield of IgY through a set of purification steps, what method can I use? Thanks in advice!
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Biochemistry of pleasure of/desire for physical exercise in mammalians and humans?

Are there some known biochemical mechanisms, that induces desire for/pleasure of physical exercise in mammalians and humans? I have heard, that horses can not live without physical exercise and they ...
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322 views

How can I change my buffer system for protein purification?

I have a protein that I purified in PBS buffer, pH 7. I will do dialysis to remove salt and will then further purify the protein with ion exchange chromatography. I will need to use another buffer (...
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43 views

Rice left in water for several months - what biological reactions or growths would occur?

In an attempt to make a hair care product, uncooked white basmati rice was left in an air-tight container half filled with tap water for several months. When opening the container, the smell was ...
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How to troubleshoot in vitro formaldehyde fixation for nucleosomes?

For an experiment, I am trying to fix the mononucleosomes (100ng) using formaldehyde as crosslinking agent in HEPES buffer. I have been using 2% formaldehyde in a reaction buffer containing 1mM EDTA, ...
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Cellular respiration in carnivorous animals

What is the equation for cellular respiration in carnivores as they don’t consume carbohydrates to break down into glucose in the following manner: Glucose + oxygen -> water + CO2 +energy. Do they (...
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What impact does substrate bonding have on GMO’s if one at all

Do GMOs increase the effect of substrate bonding? Does it minimize activation energy? Does it change concentrations or bonding potentials?
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Would Cu1 or Cu2 oral supplementation be most likely to aid lysyl oxidase (LOX) production?

Forgive the basic question, I'm not a biochemist but am interested in understanding the below: LOX of course is key for interlinking collagen & elastin. At the same time, it is claimed that Cu1 ...
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Why is double stranded DNA considered to be one molecule? [duplicate]

Wikipedia, for example, refers to DNA as "a" molecule, not two separate molecules forming a double-helix structure. Isn't this technically incorrect? There are two separate polynucleotide strands (...
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Edible and non-edible leaves [closed]

For humans, what's the difference between an edible leaf like lettuce, and a non-edible (in the sense of null nutritional value) leaf like grass?
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Blood acidity and bones

By consuming acidic foods, could one cause their blood to become acidic and therefore cause an acid+base reaction between their blood and bone? I ask this because i recently discovered bone is a ...
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Cooperative Enzyme Question

I'm currently studying for the MCATs. After doing some biochemistry practice questions, I came upon a question that I believe may be incorrectly posed. I was wondering if I'm correct in saying this or ...
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Difference between cerebroside and globoside

I have a general idea about their difference that cerebrosides have a single sugar while globosides have more than one sugars. This is the structure of a ceramide (syphingosine and a fatty acid ...
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Can a lentivirus expressed protein that is undetectable by western blot be detected by BioID?

Cloned a single herpesviral gene into pCDH-EF!-GFP and see phenotypic effect on cells of interest and viral gene transcripts BUT unable to detect ANY protein using HRP boosted western blot. Even with ...
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Why is beta- D fructofuranose two different structures when in free form and as part of sucrose?

This is the structure of fructose in free form: The right moiety is the fructose as part of sucrose. The left one being glucose: Both of the fructose are beta-D fructofuranose. But as it can be ...
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Does cat urine really fluoresce? If so, why?

I temporarily got caught in the Sad and Useless website, and found Science is Fun. Most of the claims seem plausible, but I can't guess why cat urine would fluoresce. Comments have directed me to ...
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Can something cause both breaks and cross-links in DNA?

A double strand break in DNA is exactly that: the strands of DNA are severed. A cross-linkage occurs when something forms a covalent bond between two nucleotides in DNA. However, is it possible for ...
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SDS-PAGE compared to western blotting

SDS-PAGE and western blotting are both used to separate and isolate proteins. My question is, which technique should be used when? Does one of them has advantages over the other one?
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Cracking sounds made by glowing plankton

Recently I had opportunity to swim in place with glowing plankton, it was amazing experience and it as well gave birth to few questions in my head. I manged to google that they can glow thanks to ...
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How do organophosphates actually work?

The common explanation as to what the primary mechanism of action for organophosphates (and carbamates) is is the inhibition of the enzyme acetylcholinesterase and resulting buildup of acetylcholine ...
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Why magnesium ion is needed for activity of G-proteins?

I was studying about G-protein coupled signaling sysytem, somewhere they have mentioned about need of Mg$^{2+}$ for acticty of G-protein and related it to increase of cyclic AMP production. On further ...
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What is the difference among biochemistry, molecular biology, molecular genetics and structural biology?

I have never heard of straigthforward definitions of these fields in my college lectures, and the Internet searches were not very helpful. However, from what I have learned at different subjects, this ...
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53 views

Immunoprecipitation compared to western blotting

Immunoprecipitation and western blotting are both used to locate a specific protein within a sample and to isolate it. In immunoprecipitation, a specific antibody and agarose beads ( or other ...
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186 views

What structural features make a molecule a potent opioid receptor agonist?

For instance, take morphine. It is used as a baseline for measuring the potency of opioid agonists. Its structure looks like this: But then, take heroin, around three times as potent, its structure ...
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What substances can selectively destroy certain cells?

Recently, I've watched a documentary about how, in the 1980s, people were buying and using drugs from the streets and then becoming paralyzed a few days afterwards. The drugs that they were using were ...
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Preparing sample for SDS PAGE

I have more than 10 cell lysate samples (70 µL each) whose concentration varies from 1.9 mg/mL to 4.8 mg/mL. I have 5X and 2X SDS sample buffers. I would like to prepare SDS PAGE samples in such a way ...
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Do histones constitute the largest proportion of the protein in chromosomes at mitosis?

Do histones contribute more (by mass) than non-histone proteins in the chromosomes formed during mitosis?
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Is NMDA produced in the body?

On the wiki page for NMDA it says that NMDA is a synthetic substance that mimics glutamate. So why does the body not use glutamate instead of NMDA? Also how is it possible that our body can produce ...
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If fish gills do not split H2O into H2 and O, and just take the dissolved oxygen what is left leaving the gills? [duplicate]

Could you please explain to me the exact left overs after a fish takes oxygen out of H2O?
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What phosphorylates tau protein & and what causes tau to be phosphorylated?

I want to know what phosphorylates tau protein and its 6 isoforms. I know kinases cause phosphorylation events, and in tau it can be phosphorylated in a healthy neuron in the trans conformation, but ...
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63 views

Backbone hydrogen bonds between adjacent amino acids in a protein?

Is it possible for two adjacent amino acids in a peptide to form hydrogen bonds between the backbone NH and CO? Are there any examples of such situations in proteins and how common are they? If ...
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which enzyme phosphorylates sodium potassium pump?

I know that Na+/k+ pump possess atp-ase function; so the pump will hydrolyze ATP into ADP + Pi. And I see in a figure that the pump is phosphorylated but couldn't really find which protein catalyzes ...
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Intein Splicing

Currently I am trying to read and understand this paper on intein splicing. https://sci-hub.tw/https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pubmed/22001202 However, I'm a little confused with Figure 4. Why do the ...
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76 views

Does digestion require hydrochloric acid?

Would our digestion function any differently if we secreted something else, like sulfuric or nitric acid, instead? I'd assume an acidic environment may be required, but not sure if chloride is also ...
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If overcooked hard boiled eggs show these green sulfide rings, why do scrambled/fried eggs not show this?

In the image above, the dark green rings are ferrous sulfide rings, caused when the sulfur from the egg white reacts with the iron in the egg yolk when the egg is overcooked. I was wondering, given ...
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Is it possible to stop more/extra fat from being stored in the body?

I don't mean simply by restricting eating or upping the activities, but a way to basically stop the body from adding more fat on itself down on the bio level. For example, I'm not too knowledgeable on ...
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Do cats produce DMT?

Edit: If somebody (anybody) wants to add an answer so the bounty won't go to waste, please do so! The comments have already introduced me to the Kegg metabolism database, some interesting papers, and ...
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114 views

Living potato clock? [duplicate]

Could a potato stay alive and power a clock while growing in the ground? I know how a potato clock works as a electrochemical cell and involves chemistry, but I am only interested in a growing ...
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Does every protein starts with Methionine amino acid [duplicate]

During process of protein synthesis we need AUG Codon to start translation .As we know this codon codes for Methionine amino acid so can we say that every protein starts with Methionine amino acid ?
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What are the (evolutionary) advantages of secondary transport?

Secondary active transport uses electrochemical gradients as a source of energy for the uphill transport of substrates (coupled to downhill transport of the ion). However except for in a few cases (e....
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Exocytosis of synaptic vesicles

I'm reading the following paper: http://jcs.biologists.org/content/123/6/819 The part I am really confused about is when they say: Exocytosis appears to use two alternative pathways: clathrin-...
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What is the difference between Warburg effect and Crabtree effect in metabolism? [closed]

In addition to answering my question, please suggest a good review article that provides comparison of the above effects. Which pathways affect central carbon metabolism to produce these effects? Also,...
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Rhodamine 123 Staining Function

How does Rhodamine 123 act as a probe for Mitochondrial Staining? What is the Exact Biochemical Basis? and can it Stain Chloroplast as well? Thanks in Advance