Questions tagged [cancer]

A malignant group of uncontrollably dividing cells that form a tumour. Questions regarding (proto)oncogenes and tumour-suppressor genes should also use this tag.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
-2
votes
0answers
25 views

Bio transformation [closed]

1-What is the difference between metabolic activation and detoxification? I am taking about the differences in their mechanisms? 2-In the third phase of bio transformation, what is the difference ...
1
vote
0answers
16 views

How exactly does chemotherapy cause anemia?

I’ve been trying to figure this out for the past few hours but I still can’t find something as in depth as I’m looking for. So far all I’ve found is that chemo drugs kill bone marrow cells and some ...
0
votes
0answers
8 views

Is the binding of androgen to androgen receptor in prostate cancer cells a requirement for the production of prostate-specific antigen?

The binding of androgen to the androgen receptor results in the transcription of androgen-regulated genes, which signals the proliferation of prostate cancer cells. This process also produces prostate-...
4
votes
1answer
59 views

How can Chronic myeloid Leukaemic drugs reduce the production of the Philadelphia genotype?

How can Chronic Myeloid Leukaemic drugs (Tyrosine kinase inhibitors, e.g. imatinib, etc.) that act by inhibiting bind of ATP to the active site of the BCR-ABL1 protein actually reduce the prevalence ...
0
votes
0answers
28 views

CML (Chronic Myeloid Leukemia) and blast cell percentage

I'm trying to understand the oncogenesis of CML. I have a question about CFC cells and blast cells. Are those the same? I know that in the chronic phase of CML there is a blast percentage of 1-10% of ...
0
votes
0answers
16 views

Average Amount of normal stem cells in a given organ

I am trying to find an estimate of the amount of normal stem cells in an organ, because I need it as initial conditions for a model to estimate the secondary cancer risk after radiotherapy. I know ...
0
votes
0answers
13 views

Does anybody have an references to share or idea onhow the tumor behaviour changes as it grows from oligometastasis to polymetastasis?

I have looked at the literature and mostly scientist discuss about how a metastatic lesion is formed. But what I am interested to learn is how does a new metastatic lesion develop when there is ...
1
vote
2answers
44 views

Cancer in cardiac cells

We were recently taught that cancer occurs only in those cells which undergo cell division so, cancer is not possible in cardiac cells and neurons. But we know that till a certain age our heart grows ...
1
vote
0answers
36 views

When cancer is detectable, how many sub-clones are there at that stage?

I have read somewhere that cancer is detectable when the number of cells reaches $10^7 - 10^9$, which probably varies according to the specific tumor. At this early stage, what is the expected number ...
18
votes
2answers
7k views

Why are organs not harvested from deceased cancer patients?

From my understanding, cancer is not contagious, and if a cancerous cell from a patient is introduced to a healthy person, then the immune system of the latter can destroy this cell. In such a case, ...
1
vote
1answer
41 views

Should I consider [H+] as substrate in MCT transport equation?

I'm trying to model the transport of lactate in cells (in both direction via Monocarboxylate transporters): [Lactate]intra + [H+] <----> [Lactate]extra + [H+] I found some data on kinetics of ...
2
votes
1answer
63 views

Can aflotoxin presence be inferred from the mild discolorotion at the middle parts of a hazelnut?

Can aflotoxin presence be inferred from the mild discolorotion at the middle parts of a hazelnut? For instance, how likely is it that the hazelnuts pictured below contain Aflotoxin? P.S.: these ...
0
votes
2answers
38 views

What are some good books on oncology?

I'm looking for some book suggestions on oncology, preferably I want them to be fairly recent. I am not worried if they are fairly technical, as long as they have good accurate content and layout.
4
votes
0answers
43 views

How a pathologist would analyse this H&E image?

I am working on a project which involves writing computer software to analyse histological images. A typical image looks like this: It is a Hematoxylin and Eosin stained biopsy of breast cancer ...
-2
votes
1answer
63 views

Ways cancer cells spread through blood

If I understand correctly when tumor grows, it can reach blood vessel and then spread through it to another organ - it called metastasis. How do cancer cells then are spreading through blood? Do they ...
0
votes
1answer
48 views

Getting some concept of cancer genetics

I have two groups of patients : Responders to chemotherapy and non-responders to chemotherapy. I treat this as a dichotomous ...
1
vote
1answer
87 views

Why are smaller mammals more prone to cancer and tumors

especially rats and mice usually develop cancer and tumors very fast, reducing their life expectancy. From an evolutionary point of view, how come that these mammals are so prone to cancer and tumors ...
8
votes
1answer
3k views

Why might long telomeres be selected for in laboratory mice?

In a recent episode of The Portal, Eric Weinstein sits down with his brother Bret Weinstein to discuss Bret's Reserve-Capacity Hypothesis. It's an incredible story of scientific discovery and and ...
0
votes
1answer
50 views

Circulating Tumor Cell vs Circulating Tumor DNA

I'm a little confused about the wording of these two phrases and under which context the epithelial-mesenchymal transition occurs. For example: Is it the circulating tumor cell that releases the ...
0
votes
0answers
22 views

Does anyone know any statistics about the rate of cell division of malignant cells?

I've tried to look online to find some statistical data about the rate of growth of any type of cancerous cells, but haven't been able to find any. Would anyone know an appropriate time period for a ...
1
vote
1answer
226 views

Is it safe to work with HeLa cells?

Hela cells are infected with HPV. So is it safe to work with them? What are the safety precautions?
13
votes
3answers
2k views

Are all carcinogens mutagens?

I assume that all carcinogens must be mutagens, but I've read that this is not the case. However, I can't find any good examples or an explanation of why it is not the case. How can a non-mutagenic ...
1
vote
1answer
45 views

KRAS gene and K-Ras Mutations

This question pertains to the KRAS wikipedia page, and I just want to double check and clarify my own understanding of how this mutation works in cancer. It states: K-Ras protein acts like a switch ...
0
votes
1answer
63 views

A question about cancer antigens and their mechanism [closed]

Can you name the most common antigen that cancer cells in general can't live without?
0
votes
0answers
36 views

Which sample type is more proper for whole genome sequencing in AML patients? Peripheral blood or bone marrow?

I intend to perform whole genome sequencing in AML patients in order to find genomic abnormalities, particularly translocation and gene fusions. However, I am not sure whether it is better to obtain ...
1
vote
1answer
105 views

How do tumor cells 'gravitate' towards each other?

In a popular article it is mentioned that in centrifugal experiments with cancer cells that When subjected to microgravity-conditions, the cancer cells were unable to sense each other and therefore ...
1
vote
1answer
38 views

Can primary tumor cells grow in 2D culture? [closed]

Is it possible to expand primary tumor cells in 2D culture? Are they adherent cells? Do you have any experience especially with culturing non-small cell lung cancer in 2D? Thank you.
1
vote
1answer
44 views

Could tumor cells have normal genomic profiles?

I have thawed primary tumor cells and performed FACS. They were EpCAM positive cells. Then, I expanded them as organoids in 3D and did another FACS analysis. Again, they were EpCAM positive. I also ...
2
votes
1answer
37 views

Can a drug induce specific mechanism of resistance in tumors?

For example, can a drug that targets a given protein induce overexpression of that protein or increase the copy number of the gene coding that protein? I strongly suspect that antineoplastic ...
0
votes
1answer
63 views

Is p53 a cyclin dependent kinase? [closed]

I've been reading some research papers about p53 and associated tumour suppressor proteins, such as p21. I see them referred to and associated with cyclin-dependent kinases. Is p53,p63 et cetera part ...
4
votes
2answers
93 views

What is the substance that tumors release that stimulates growth of blood vessels but suppresses its release from other tumors?

I'm currently in high school and I am working on a cancer research project. My project consists of a cancer, and different ways to treat it. I have a set of benign tumor and I was thinking of ...
2
votes
1answer
60 views

Where does the number 67 in the nuclear protein/antigen Ki-67 come from? Why not 66 or 68?

I have read in in the original paper that in the year 1983 a research group in Kiel, Germany (that's where the Ki- in the name comes from) developed monoclonal mouse antibodies against Hodgkin ...
1
vote
2answers
77 views

How do mutations and protein synthesis link to cancer?

How do mutations and protein synthesis link to cancer? I know that a mutation in DNA can cause the triplet code on the mRNA to change so different amini acids are made and a different order means a ...
0
votes
1answer
72 views

What does “radiographic progression” mean in cancer?

I tried looking up the definition of the term "radiographic progression" using Google and medical dictionary, etc., but I couldn't find its meaning anywhere. All research articles that I found just ...
1
vote
2answers
73 views

Are tumor-associated antigens unique to cancerous cells?

Are tumor-associated antigens found only on the membrane of cancerous cells or just over-expressed on the membrane of carcinogenic cells? In other words, are these antigens also found on healthy ...
0
votes
1answer
45 views

Non-coding DNA as a protection to deleterious mutations

We know that most part of our genome (at least 75 percent) is non-coding DNA. Can it be a way to protect the organism from mutations in important genes, such as the ones which control cellular cycle, ...
1
vote
0answers
50 views

Which chemokines are being produced by melanocytes?

I am looking into Vitiligo it's an autoimmune disease that results in apoptosis of melanocytes due to misfolded protein accumulation. It also dramatically increases breast cancer rates (600 times) ...
0
votes
1answer
38 views

Does anyone know a good pancreatic-cancer metastasis cell line?

Researching about pancreatic cancer. We have mostly "main-tumor" cell lines in our lab, and I´m currently looking for cell lines originating from metastases (liver, lung, etc.). Does anyone know a ...
0
votes
0answers
31 views

How to troubleshoot in vitro formaldehyde fixation for nucleosomes?

For an experiment, I am trying to fix the mononucleosomes (100ng) using formaldehyde as crosslinking agent in HEPES buffer. I have been using 2% formaldehyde in a reaction buffer containing 1mM EDTA, ...
1
vote
1answer
60 views

Are these 2 procedures to fight cancer (cancer “vaccine”, and cancer drugs which can attack all tumours) related?

Last year appeared the new of a cancer "vaccine" (not a vaccine in the traditional sense) tested in animals for 4 types of cancer and which worked in 97% of the cases to eliminate already existent ...
3
votes
1answer
151 views

Explain to a layperson how cigarettes smoke might cause cancer

I have a very intelligent friend who is a light smoker, and also a Biology layperson. I wondered whether understanding exactly how cigarettes smoke can cause cancer, might encourage him to smoke less ...
0
votes
1answer
106 views

If we can make magic bullets that are basically artificial antibodies, why has a cure for cancer not yet been developed? [closed]

So protonsil and salvarsan 606 where both used as the first magic bullets in the modern period of medicine in the 1900s. However, if we can create artificial antibodies that target specific diseases ...
0
votes
0answers
34 views

what causes epigenetic dysregulation in cancer?

Do mutations in regulatory gene sequences lead to changes in epigenetic alterations in cancer, and if so which ones? I know abnormal hypermethylation of GCP islands occurs in promoters of tumour ...
2
votes
0answers
41 views

Weight of fresh vs frozen tumours

I have some mouse tumours that have been snap frozen in liquid nitrogen following an in vivo study, and I thought it might be interesting to also determine the weight of the tumours. I was wondering ...
2
votes
1answer
83 views

Can radiation exposure cause cancer later in life even if no traces of radioactive material are present in the body anymore?

I had a long-lasting debate with a friend of mine about the Fukushima incident. The question that we tried to solve was if radiation or toxin exposure can cause cancer later in life even if no ...
0
votes
1answer
92 views

Are all fusion genes somatic in origin or can fusion genes be germline?

Fusion genes should have an origin.These are essentially hybrid genes that are translocated in its entirety. Eg. BCR-ABL, EML4-ALK are known to be implicated in cancer pathogenesis. Do these ...
0
votes
1answer
157 views

Why are babies rarely born with cancer?

Childhood cancer is fundamentally a disease of dysregulated development. Why does it rarely occur during the fetal period, a time of enormous growth and development?
1
vote
1answer
1k views

What is a Archival Tumor Tissue ? For What Purpose is it collected?

Over the course of Conducting trials various tissue and tumor samples are collected from the patients. One such sample is the Archival Tumor Tissue. Could someone kindly clarify what is the meaning ...
2
votes
0answers
131 views

Why do BRAF mutations appear more in skin cutaneous melanoma?

When looking at the tissue expression of the BRAF protein it seems that BRAF is regularly expressed in almost all of the tissues. There is elevated expression in tissues like the Testis and the ...
0
votes
0answers
27 views

What part of the skin is damaged under sun exposure?

How exactly does extensive sun exposure lead to skin damage and increase cancer risk. In which part of the skin is the sun doing the most damage. Is it in the epidermis or beneath ? I would like to ...

1
2 3 4 5
8