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Questions tagged [cancer]

A malignant group of uncontrollably dividing cells that form a tumour. Questions regarding (proto)oncogenes and tumour-suppressor genes should also use this tag.

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Need help in identifying and understanding the origin of an expression variant

We usually denote the origin of a mutation as either somatic or germline. This information is usually available in certain databases such as CIVIC, ClinVar, COSMIC etc. But when we come to variants ...
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1answer
70 views

Can radiation exposure cause cancer later in life even if no traces of radioactive material are present in the body anymore?

I had a long-lasting debate with a friend of mine about the Fukushima incident. The question that we tried to solve was if radiation or toxin exposure can cause cancer later in life even if no ...
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Are all fusion genes somatic in origin or can fusion genes be germline?

Fusion genes should have an origin.These are essentially hybrid genes that are translocated in its entirety. Eg. BCR-ABL, EML4-ALK are known to be implicated in cancer pathogenesis. Do these ...
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1answer
49 views

Why are babies rarely born with cancer?

Childhood cancer is fundamentally a disease of dysregulated development. Why does it rarely occur during the fetal period, a time of enormous growth and development?
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41 views

What is a Archival Tumor Tissue ? For What Purpose is it collected?

Over the course of Conducting trials various tissue and tumor samples are collected from the patients. One such sample is the Archival Tumor Tissue. Could someone kindly clarify what is the meaning ...
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what is the difference between a “subclonal expansion” and a “clonal sweep”

I am trying to understand the difference between a subclonal expansion, and a clonal sweep and therefore why this means that some subclonal mutations are important.
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Why do BRAF mutations appear more in skin cutaneous melanoma?

When looking at the tissue expression of the BRAF protein it seems that BRAF is regularly expressed in almost all of the tissues. There is elevated expression in tissues like the Testis and the ...
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What part of the skin is damaged under sun exposure?

How exactly does extensive sun exposure lead to skin damage and increase cancer risk. In which part of the skin is the sun doing the most damage. Is it in the epidermis or beneath ? I would like to ...
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1answer
64 views

Do mutated c-sis oncogenes only affect cell growth?

Since c-sis regulates only cell growth, a mutation there should only lead to an out of control growth of the cell, but the cells would still be mature, since c-sis does not regulate the function or ...
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Cell lines with P21 mutations and P53 wild type

Can someone name a few Colon cancer cell lines with P21 mutations? I have found the KM12, SNU-C5, and SNU-1040 cell lines but all of them have P53 mutations in them. I need to obtain cell lines ...
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1answer
59 views

Can a hydra get cancer?

Because hydras have immune systems, telomerase activity, and Piwi-piRNA like cancer cells I wonder if they can get cancer?
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Typical concentration of oxygen for hypoxia and necrosis due to lack of nutrients

I'm a physicist and I'm interested in hypoxia due to the lack of nutrients at the center of avascular tumors. So I have a few questions about hypoxia. Below which concentration of oxygen and other ...
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1answer
61 views

Why don't rates of cancer increase generation to generation?

As cells divide, they accumulate mutations that can sometimes cause cancer. Gametes have to divide like any other cell, and thus generation to generation mutations should accumulate in people's ...
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Can a dividing cell that skipped DNA replication become cancerous?

Let's assume that a cell fails to replicate its DNA during the S Phase of the cell cycle. Let's also assume that the appropriate CDKs are inactive (perhaps due to mutation or lack of cyclin proteins ...
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1answer
24 views

For a luekemia patient - how does the chemotherapy fixes the bone marrow to not produce immature cells

For ALL patient this link says 90% of the children are cured. It has high survival rate. From what I understand is that - luekemia is type of cancer where the immature cells does not turn into ...
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Fluoroquinolone mitochondrial and genomic DNA adduct

What could be possible consequences of covalent bond mitochondrial and genomic DNA adduct by Fluoroquinolones, our study was done by Fluoroquinolone Toxicity Study NFP. All 50+ participates who took ...
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3answers
9k views

Can a cancerous cell from outside cause cancer in a healthy person?

If a cancerous cell enters the body of a healthy person from someone else's blood or something, will that healthy person get cancer? In human beings.
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39 views

Chance of cancer as a function of smoking frequency

I was wondering if there is some kind of known relation between the chance of getting cancer and the frequency of smoking cigarettes. A quick Google search did not yield results. Would any of you ...
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1answer
49 views

What don't we know about cancer? [closed]

I was wondering, after decades of research what we do not know about Cancer yet as in what unanswered questions are still puzzling biologists about cancer? I have read that cancer research, in its ...
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3answers
261 views

can a bacterium cell become a cancer?

I don't mean if a bacterium can be the cause of cancer inside a human. But can actually a bacterium changes in the way as normal cells change into tumor cells? So gaining such characteristics of a ...
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229 views

Can mitochondria become cancerous?

Given that mitochondria have their own DNA and can replicate independently, can they ever become cancerous? For example, could a mutation in their DNA cause them to rapidly replicate, ultimately ...
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1answer
123 views

Can oral baking soda effect tumor cells in mice

Could anyone explain me please, how exactly (according to research article in Cell journal) adding the baking soda in drinking water can influence the acidity of tumor cells? What about homeostasis ...
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1answer
76 views

Why telomere shortening slowing down cancer?

I am reading Alternative Lengthening of Telomeres in Mammalian Cells, about how telomeres linked to human cancers. Due to the end-replication problem,5,6 the ends of linear chromosomes shorten ...
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Why is CLL B-Cell leukemia t(12;21) more responsive to chemotherapy?

Chronic Lympoid Leukemia targeting B-Cell (with the particular translocation mutation on chromosome 12 and 21) is known to be more responsive to chemotherapy. Is there a known molecular mechanism for ...
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Can you eat cancer cells without risk?

Afaik GMO products are not a real risk to health of course if they do not contain toxins. But how about cancer cells? Like say rhabdomyosarcoma which is more or less a muscle cancer found also in ...
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How does latency in carcinogenisis differ from the effect of chance?

Most chemically induced cancers seem to have a long latency between exposure to the carcinogen and expression of the disease. Mesothelioma typically 30-40 years, bladder cancer about 20 years, for ...
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1answer
113 views

Can a plasmid cause cancer? [closed]

Can a plasmid cause cancer? According to wikipedia, plasmids are normally present in bacteria They (plasmids) are normally present in bacteria , and sometimes in eukaryotic organisms such as yeast [...
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243 views

Why are only few cigarette smokers prone to cancer?

It's tacit that only a few populace of smokers get cancer. What spares the others from it or what specifically cause cancer in those populace? See this Washington Post Article
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1answer
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Is a large tumor is more likely to develop hypoxic regions?

It is known that cancerous tumors in humans can develop hypoxic regions where no blood nor oxygen arrive to some volume of its cells, creating a dead lump inside or around the tumor. See Wikipedia - ...
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2answers
175 views

Is glyphosate carcinogenic?

I'm trying to understand if glyphosate is carcinogenic. The information in internet is very confusing. There are many ecological oriented websites which claim it's carcinogenic which I suppose they ...
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1answer
119 views

What is the meaning of “Rb is in the active state”?

I am reading about cyclins, cdks and Rb (Retinoblastoma) and some of the terminology is not clear to me. I understand that when CDK phosphorylates Rb, it disconnects from E2F, and E2F can act as a ...
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1answer
112 views

Does a certain tumor type being invasive mean that it is highly metastatic?

Does a certain tumor type being invasive mean that it is highly metastatic?
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2answers
331 views

Distinction between primary and secondary tumor

How can a primary tumor be distinguished from a secondary tumor? I tried finding it on the internet but it only said that they are found by means of immunohistology but I couldn't understand how....
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29 views

What is(are) the mechanism(s) that stop cells from fusing in vivo?

I just learned about the phenomenon of 'cell fusion' in which two diploid somatic cells can combine into some aneuploid cell in vitro and proceed to proliferate in culture. Apparently this can even ...
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1answer
128 views

Is it possible to make a cancer cell that doesn’t encode any neoantigens?

The cell still has mutations, but those mutations only occur in the noncoding sequences, such as promoters, which drives over expression of proto-oncogenes and downregulation of tumor suppressor genes....
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1answer
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What is the precise mechanism by which exercise reduces chance of cancer?

Sources like this: http://www.cancerresearchuk.org/about-cancer/causes-of-cancer/physical-activity-and-cancer/how-physical-activity-prevents-cancer point out that we can reduce our risk of some ...
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1answer
154 views

Which cancers are routinely treated with anti-angiogenic therapy? [closed]

I have been asked to discuss 2 of these cancers and how the therapy is used. I understand angiogenesis and its role in tumour progression, but need some help in explaining how the therapy is used.
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1answer
54 views

Tumour cell injection into a mice [closed]

I am going to inject mice tumour cells into mice to create them tumours and I am wondering if I need to have special precautions for that, even they are cells from mice tumour I am afraid what can ...
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1answer
39 views

Can cancer cells transmit from one organism to another?

I know cancer cells are very resilient, so would it be possible for them to survive outside of the original organism for long enough to be absorbed by another? Furthermore, would that type of "...
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1answer
307 views

How long does it take for cancer to be detectable if it grows from a single cell? [closed]

Assuming cancer has its origins at a single malfunctioning cell, how long would it take for that cell to grow from the point at which it is malfunctioning enough so that it can be detected by the ...
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1answer
123 views

Are new blood vessels able to deliver oxygen to hypoxic tissue before the establishment of blood circulation?

Sprouting angiogenesis - the growth of new blood vessels from a preexisting vasculature - can be triggered by cells in hypoxia in order to re-stablish the oxygen and nutrients supply to the tissue. ...
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1answer
520 views

Can neurons become cancerous?

I've been reading about brain cancer lately, and something I've noticed is that the tumors seem to start in all tissues, except neural tissue. Am I missing something, or is there an explanation?
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CDK3 1 simple coding mutation/missense mutations (S106N) glioma

I found the below quotation in (Peyressatre, 2015) CDK3 1 simple coding mutation/missense mutations (S106N) glioma [135] The author has cited a database but not a paper. I want to find the ...
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3answers
166 views

Why is cancer more lethal than (hypothetical)infections?

I am a computer science student and I'm interested in algorithmic aspects of cancer! Once I heard that there exist more bacteria in human body than our own cells, I wondered that why bacteria, which ...
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3answers
94 views

do tumour cells begin with abnormal characteristics?

At what point in the cell cycle do cells start to become tumorous? Do they have abnormal characteristics to begin with; if so what are they?
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Treatment validation on mouse models

I am struggling to set up a project proposal for validation of a known treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer in mouse models. I want to see how SNPs in patients contribute to their drug ...
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0answers
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Embolism risk in cancer [closed]

Why is there an increased risk of embolism in any malignancy? I studied that malignancy is a risk factor for pulmonary embolism. Can someone explain me the exact mechanism under which malignancy ...
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2answers
2k views

Why are tumor suppressor genes recessive?

In my Intro. to Biochemistry course, we have been studying cancer. The professor has pointed out that tumor suppressor genes are "recessive" while proto-oncogenes are "dominant". Since only one ...
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Characterising mechanisms responsible for generating structural variants

I have a high-quality set of structural variant breakpoints from tumour/normal WGS data, and I am interested in digging into the various mechanisms that might be involved in each event. There are ...
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152 views

How medical studies induce cancer in lab animals?

To test the effectiveness of drugs, they are typically tested on animals. How cancer is induced in lab animals to test the effectiveness of cancer drugs?