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Questions tagged [cancer]

A malignant group of uncontrollably dividing cells that form a tumour. Questions regarding (proto)oncogenes and tumour-suppressor genes should also use this tag.

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DNA slippage as the cause of insertion mutations in cancer cells?

I'm a computer science student who has started working with DNA. I know the basics but not everything. While working on the ICGC data, I found a weird pattern in the insertions: In around 60% of the ...
Wassim Jaoui's user avatar
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17 views

For Cytotox studies of anticancer compounds: What cell line can I use to check if my compounds will also damage healthy cells?

I am about to perform cytotox studies on cells with my synthesized compounds. I want to test my structures against MCF7 cells (breast cancer) as well as a melanoma cell line. MCF7 should be vunerable ...
raptorlane's user avatar
1 vote
1 answer
52 views

How much effort is it to establish a cytotox assay for cancer cell lines against a small number of possible compounds?

I am currently testing a series (5-10) of small molecule compounds against an enzyme that are intended as inhibitors. This enzyme is meaningful for cell proliferation. Until now, nothing was active ...
raptorlane's user avatar
0 votes
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32 views

How to keep primary human cancer cells alive in vitro and derive a cell line?

I am studying a human cohort of patients treated with neoadjuvant immunotherapy before surgery, of whom we have pre- and post-treatment biopsies as well as the resection. In one patient's resection, ...
immunoLogical's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
358 views

Could multiplexed CRISPR disable the mitotic and meiotic genes of cancerous cells?

Although I believe there is a good reason -- or reasons -- why this theory, that CRISPR could disable the genes for division in cancerous cells, is incorrect, I haven't been able to find them. In ...
Colin Pace's user avatar
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1 answer
125 views

If microwave radiation is dangerous for rats why is not for human?

This study show how cell phone radiation(microwave) cause brain cancer at rats. If microwave is dangerous for rats why is not for human? What is difference between rat and human cells, so we are ...
22flower's user avatar
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206 views

Can human hair, animal fur and birds feather get cancer?

Hair, fur and feather protect skin from cancer(sun UV light). I am interested can human hair, mammal fur or birds feather get cancer? (Some migration birds like swifts spent 10 months in year in the ...
22flower's user avatar
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What is the difference between an immortalized human cell line and a cancerous cell line?

Many cell lines (like CaCo2) are derived from cancerous tissue, and hence, like any other tumor cell, they have an infinite replicative potential. However, many cell lines like HaCaT cells are not ...
Adheeti's user avatar
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Can thymocytes end up in a lymph node instead of thymus?

Can thymocytes exiting bone marrow end up in a lymph node instead of thymus? If not why? Here is my thought: thymocyte in the bloodstream, on its way to thymus, can leak into interstitium with blood ...
MCH's user avatar
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AKT and chemoresistance in cancer

I would like to know your opinion about a paper on AKT-mediated chemoresistance and ion channels. The idea is that the protein AKT is involved in chemoresistance by activating several downstream ...
Craw Craw's user avatar
2 votes
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69 views

Why are deformable cancer cells associated with being more malignant or dangerous?

So I was watching a lecture that talked about circulating tumor cells/cancer stem cells, and the professor mentioned that deformable cancer cells tend to be more dangerous to us. Why is this so? Does ...
Maia Mukamal's user avatar
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Is proliferating stem cells dangerous on some aspects?

By searching on internet about replication of stem cells, I came across numerous articles speaking about how to activate stem cell proliferation, most articles searching "natural" means for ...
totalMongot's user avatar
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38 views

Have the potential therapeutic applications of cell fusion between cancer cells and neural cells been investigated?

Studies have appeared on the possible role that cell fusion plays in the formation of certain cancers. For instance, Sitar et al. (2019) have looked into the process of cell fusion in the formation of ...
Max Muller's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
27 views

Contrast Fluids in MRI: Which tissues "glow" first?

I am a bioinformatic and data scientist in progress, working on my Master Thesis about prostate cancer. Now I am at that point, I have a strong guessing, that contrast fluids in magnetic resonance ...
Allerleirauh's user avatar
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1 answer
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What is a crypt in a histopathological image?

I am doing a science fair project on using histopathological images for cancer diagnosis, and I came across something that says a characteristic is exemplified by superficial serrated architecture and ...
Samarth's user avatar
4 votes
0 answers
119 views

Why are lymph nodes located where they are? [closed]

According to the National Cancer Institute, a subdivision of the National Institutes of Health, clusters of lymph nodes are found in the neck, underarm, chest, abdomen, and groin. Why are lymph nodes ...
user avatar
1 vote
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immunotherapy - how would the inhibitor detect

It's a known fact that if PD-L1 happens to be on cancer cells, it will signall off to the T-cell's receptor(PD-1) to turn off its activation, resulting in a fact ...
Giorgi Lagidze's user avatar
1 vote
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cancer cell - antigen presenting cell

We all know that if normal cell contains virus inside it, normal cell has mechanism inside it that can detect that it has abnormality inside(virus) and what it will do is present the virus's protein(...
Giorgi Lagidze's user avatar
1 vote
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30 views

Is deleting two or three consecutive nucleotides and inserting exactly two or three back more common than two or three consecutive SNP?

I am looking at cancer mutations. I found that some of the mutations are e.g. c.1251_1252delGGinsTT c.151_152delGGinsTC c.351_352delCAinsTT I wonder if these are indeed two consecutive single ...
William Wong's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
138 views

Do cancer cells use as much NADH as normal cells?

Recent literature shows that cancer cells have a different electron transport chain mechanism from normal cells and both of cancer cells and normal cells use NADH as electron donors. So, is there a ...
Kevin's user avatar
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3 votes
1 answer
359 views

Why does a non-functional retinoblastoma protein cause tumours in the cells of the retina specifically?

I know that the name of the protein itself is the retinoblastoma protein - but that's only because the result of a pathogenic variant is retinoblastoma. I'm trying to kind of reverse engineer the name ...
Zuhair Qureshi's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
66 views

When do retinal cells stop differentiating? [closed]

I am having a hard time recalling where I had heard this, but I do recall someone saying (perhaps in a video) that cells in the retina divide very rapidly during infancy due to ongoing development of ...
Zuhair Qureshi's user avatar
3 votes
1 answer
42 views

Cancer: computing the proliferation of DNA mutations in cancer cells

I have a question about cancer. How is it, that in a cancerogenous cell, once a specific gene changes, subsequent DNAs in cells end up exponentially acquiring more and more mutations? Can, these ...
Joselin Jocklingson's user avatar
0 votes
2 answers
104 views

Is retinoblastoma truly an autosomal dominant condition?

I am getting, in my opinion, very conflicting information from sources about the inheritance of retinoblastoma, a type of cancer. Hereditary retinoblastoma is associated with defects in the gene ...
Zuhair Qureshi's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
37 views

Heat shock proteins in T cells of tumor microenvironment

Analyzing human tumor single-cell RNA sequencing (scRNA-seq) data, I found abundant expression of Heat shock protein (HSP) family genes in T cells. My literature review on "HSPs in T cells" ...
Yulia Kentieva's user avatar
4 votes
1 answer
127 views

Why doesn't HIV give you cancer if retroviral gene therapy gives you cancer?

More than twenty patients have been treated in France and Britain, with a high rate of immune system reconstitution observed. Similar trials were restricted or halted in the US when leukemia was ...
keyandthegate's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
83 views

Need help identifying vascular structures in brain matter

I am working on PET images of the brain. The neuro-oncologist I'm working with identified 2 large high-intensity regions as vascular structures. I've been meaning to ask what structures these are ...
nibs's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
67 views

snRNAseq vs scRNAseq in cancer

my question is about phagocytosis as response to cancer. It is known that cytotoxic T cell may kill a cancer cell and sends cytokines to phagocytes like macrophage or dendritic cell to engulf and ...
MCH's user avatar
  • 141
0 votes
1 answer
103 views

A study claims that the consumption of fish increases the likelihood of getting skin cancer, does this have any relation to their omega-3 content?

A study claims that fish consumption increases the likelihood of getting skin cancer. Since another older study claimed that omega-3 consumption increases the likelihood of prostate cancer is there ...
GEP's user avatar
  • 111
8 votes
0 answers
190 views

Why don’t all HPV strains cause cancers?

There are roughly a dozen high risk HPV strains responsible for cervical cancer. These strains promote hyperplasia of infected cells by encoding E6 and E7, which potently antagonize tumor suppressor ...
哲煜黄's user avatar
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1 vote
1 answer
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Expected variant allele frequency of mutation present on 2 out of 3 copies of a 70% purity cancer sample

I am reading Nik-Zainal et al., 2012. In such paper, (for sample PD4120a - a 188-fold depth ER+ breast cancer tumor), it is stated that: The sample has 70% tumor purity. The genome has one triploid ...
gc5's user avatar
  • 820
0 votes
1 answer
56 views

Variant Allele Frequency (VAF) peaks for clonal CNAs

I am reading an overview of the CNAqc package, which defines how the algorithm computes "Variant Allele Frequency (VAF) peaks for clonal CNAs." mutations present in a percentage $0<c<...
gc5's user avatar
  • 820
4 votes
1 answer
42 views

Targeted gene sequencing and specialist analysis compared to WGS and DYI searches

There seem to be a lot of "genetic consulting" services that focus on things like cancer, with a modus operandi of: Do targeted gene sequencing (usually on a few tumor suppressor genes ...
George's user avatar
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1 vote
0 answers
34 views

Inheritance likelihood of SNVs vs InDels [closed]

Suppose you have identified a couple of variants in a tumour sample. One of them is a deletion and the other is an SNV in the same gene. You have a familial history of prostate cancer and other ...
Richard Asbjørn Køselsen's user avatar
2 votes
0 answers
235 views

Difference between IC50 and Michaelis-Menten constant

I am new to biology, and getting to know the term IC50, I found that there is a connection between IC50 and Michaelis-Menten constant by the Cheng-Prusoff equation $K_{i}=\frac{\mathrm{IC}_{50}}{1+\...
LOVEMATH's user avatar
1 vote
0 answers
45 views

Calculation of drug efficacy- mathematical biology approach

I am participating in a mathematical biology project. I would like to discuss the following problem: Let A be a drug such that $x_{o}$ chemical units of it kills 12% of $y$ cells per 1 day, I would ...
LOVEMATH's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
231 views

Does cancer really remain undetected about 80% of its life?

I was reading Atomic Habits by James Clear, who mentioned this and decided to google it. The only mention of this at least in the first search page was from this source from February, 2012. Is there ...
heretoinfinity's user avatar
22 votes
2 answers
4k views

Is it possible to make a vaccine against cancer?

If we can make RNA vaccines against COVID-19 and we know which errors in our DNA leads to different kinds of cancer, can we make a vaccine that will teach our immune system to detect and destroy ...
Robotex's user avatar
  • 339
5 votes
1 answer
164 views

How have some cancers "evolved" to be so aggressive and treatment-resistant?

[In this post, I may ascribe agency to processes, inanimate objects or microorganisms: this is rhetorical, I know they don't "intend" anything. I will also use "evolution" in a ...
diwhyyyyy's user avatar
  • 151
2 votes
2 answers
83 views

Why do tumours need stem cells, when they can generate their own telomerase?

In the molecular biology of the cell (6th ed), it is stated that: Some cancers seem to be organized in a similar way: they consist of rare cancer stem cells capable of dividing indefinitly, toghether ...
Magnus's user avatar
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-1 votes
1 answer
101 views

Can we cure cancer with CRISPR dead Cas?

Here's a silly idea I had this morning: Sequence a bunch of normal patient cells. Sequence a bunch of tumor cells from a biopsy. Find a DNA sequence that we're reasonably certain exists in the cancer ...
416E64726577's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
102 views

How do I classify cytotoxicity values, whether a sample is mildly, moderately, or highly cytotoxic?

I used LDH assay for cytotoxicity testing. I have a plant extract which I tested against HepG2 cancer cells. I did three trials, my results were 2%, 6%, and 8% cytotoxicity, respectively. How do I ...
Maria's user avatar
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5 votes
0 answers
115 views

How do evolutionary forces influence the number of copies of the p53 gene?

p53 is an important tumor suppressor gene. Around 50% of cancers are associated with loss of function in p53. Humans have only two copies of p53 in their genome (one on each homologous chromosome). ...
PejoPhylo's user avatar
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4 votes
1 answer
128 views

Why would this viral strain-specific antiserum fail to immunoprecipitate the same (98% identical protein) from another strain?

I'm reading this paper https://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC392475/ and I can't work out why a certain immune serum didn't work on the same viral protein but from different strains. The serum ...
autumn's user avatar
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0 votes
2 answers
64 views

Is it possible for a plant extract to have different effects, depending on the type of cell line it was tested on?

My plant extract (ethyl acetate fraction) seems to have two different effects depending on the cell/cell line it's being tested on. On liver cancer cells (HepG2), it is moderately cytotoxic. But on ...
Maria's user avatar
  • 19
1 vote
1 answer
126 views

Why is the BRCA-1 mutation dominant?

BRCA-1 is a tumor suppressor gene and on mutation can undergo a loss of function to become cancer-inducing. Loss of function mutations are usually recessive and require the mutation of both alleles. ...
Jfjdkksjsjk's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
68 views

Do all tumour variants affect the disease pathway

I have analysed some lung tumour samples for somatic variants which generated a list of genes affected by those variants. I tried to analyse KEGG pathways to see what could they disrupt. However, many ...
Richard Asbjørn Køselsen's user avatar
0 votes
0 answers
50 views

Exclusion and inclusion criteria for healthy controls in colorectal cancer study

I'm working on colorectal cancer, and I'm facing a problem in the sampling step, I can't figure out how to choose healthy subjects. In the literature, I've found many criteria that are different and ...
Noor Elhouda's user avatar
0 votes
1 answer
42 views

Data repositories for data on the Tumor Microenvironment?

Does anyone know of any data repositories for data on the Tumor Microenvironment? I know of the The Cancer Gene Atlas and the Gene Expression Omnibus databases but I'm more curious about data on the (...
Aaron's user avatar
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-1 votes
1 answer
62 views

Coinfecting oncolytic viruses - first virus carrying the receptor for the second

One challenge to using oncolytic viruses as a treatment for cancer is that the viruses may cause off-target effects. I'm curious to know how useful it would be to create an oncolytic virus that has ...
Aaron's user avatar
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