Questions tagged [cancer]

A malignant group of uncontrollably dividing cells that form a tumour. Questions regarding (proto)oncogenes and tumour-suppressor genes should also use this tag.

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Y Chromosome in Ovary Cancer Data

I have been analyzing TCGA Ovary Cancer data. In Somatic Mutation data, there is data of mutations in all the chromosomes (1-22 and X), but amazingly, I have found one (just one) row of Y Chromosome ...
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225 views

What's the difference between proliferation and diffusion when talking about changes in tumor density?

Cell proliferation and cell diffusion seem to be important quantities to estimate when trying to understand or measure tumor growth, but I don't really understand a) the difference between them or b) ...
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Escaping resource limitations during tumor evolution

In their discussion of the importance of r- and K-selection on tumors, Aktipis et al. (2013; figure 3) provide the following illustration of a hypothetical cancer growth curve: In it, you can see ...
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How a pathologist would analyse this H&E image?

I am working on a project which involves writing computer software to analyse histological images. A typical image looks like this: It is a Hematoxylin and Eosin stained biopsy of breast cancer ...
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130 views

Can a dividing cell that skipped DNA replication become cancerous?

Let's assume that a cell fails to replicate its DNA during the S Phase of the cell cycle. Let's also assume that the appropriate CDKs are inactive (perhaps due to mutation or lack of cyclin proteins ...
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150 views

What are the sizes of the cells that make up human hair?

The question is in the title, but I'll explain why the question arose. I'm curious about the rates that various cells in the body divide, and have found various information relating to this, but ...
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77 views

How are oncogenes targeted for therapy?

How would oncogenes be targeted for therapy and are there any examples of existing therapies for such cancers if the gene was upregulated (i) as a result of copy number variation and (ii) due to ...
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41 views

Weight of fresh vs frozen tumours

I have some mouse tumours that have been snap frozen in liquid nitrogen following an in vivo study, and I thought it might be interesting to also determine the weight of the tumours. I was wondering ...
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131 views

Why do BRAF mutations appear more in skin cutaneous melanoma?

When looking at the tissue expression of the BRAF protein it seems that BRAF is regularly expressed in almost all of the tissues. There is elevated expression in tissues like the Testis and the ...
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27 views

Can a regulator genes be more highly expressed when it has more places to bind?

I am doing some research on small cell lung cancer and, from what I have found, many tumors show high levels of ASCL1, which is a regulator for neuroendocrine cell differentiation. However, no papers ...
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212 views

How can I download histological slide from Cancer Digital Slide Archive

Could you tell me if it possible and how to download images data from http://cancer.digitalslidearchive.net ? Thank you.
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100 views

Can HBV pseudotyped oncolytic viruses be used to treat hepatocellular carcinoma?

Chronic hepatitis B is the leading cause of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Oncolytic virotherapy (OV) is an emerging tool to treat cancer. However, one challenge of OV is that our immune system may ...
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2k views

Is blood donation risky for patients with MGUS?

Monoclonal gammopathy of unknown significance (MGUS) is often considered a pre-cancerous condition. Blood donors with MGUS are typically advised to discontinue blood donation as their blood may be ...
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80 views

Can telomere length maintenance be an answer to increased life span of human beings?

Telomere shortening may prevent the development of cancer in human aged cells by limiting the number of cell divisions. However, shortening of telomeres impairs immune function and thus might also ...
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457 views

Can cancerous cells reach the Hayflick limit?

This may be a stupid question, but I've been wondering. Each time a cell divides, the telomeres on the chromosomes shorten. If this goes on for long enough, the chromosomes will no longer have ...
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375 views

Why are sarcomas rare compared to carcinomas?

A sarcoma (from the Greek σάρξ sarx meaning "flesh") is a cancer that arises from transformed cells of mesenchymal origin. Thus, malignant tumors made of cancellous bone, cartilage, fat, muscle, ...
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82 views

Why lactate inhibits growth (or enhances death rate)?

Extracellular lactate tends to inhibit cellular growth or enhance cell death. This happens in the vicinity of tumors and in cell cultures. See for example this reference: Ozturk, Sadettin S., Mark R....
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69 views

Effect of cellular phone towers on human health

We live in world of mobiles, tablets, PCs and other electronic gadgets. We are continuously exposed to radio frequencies and other cellular frequencies. Generally, all of these waves are very low ...
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49 views

Subtypes of Acute myeloid leukemia

I am a computer scientist with no biological background and working on analyzing lab results of patients with Acute myeloid leukemia. They have been tagged with following subtypes of AML: AML with ...
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530 views

Best way to automatically link Gene Entrez ID with Gene Symbol in TCGA

I am trying to figure out how to link Gene Entrez ID with Gene Symbol, for TCGA dataset. So far, I have found this ftp directory with Gene info updated daily. But, for Entrez ID 728661, I have found ...
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138 views

A number of questions regarding chemotaxis assay using PBMCs

In our lab we would like to study the chemotaxis of PBMCs towards conditioned medium obtained following treatment of cancer cells with different compounds. My questions are regarding the method of ...
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15 views

How exactly does chemotherapy cause anemia?

I’ve been trying to figure this out for the past few hours but I still can’t find something as in depth as I’m looking for. So far all I’ve found is that chemo drugs kill bone marrow cells and some ...
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36 views

When cancer is detectable, how many sub-clones are there at that stage?

I have read somewhere that cancer is detectable when the number of cells reaches $10^7 - 10^9$, which probably varies according to the specific tumor. At this early stage, what is the expected number ...
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1answer
105 views

How do tumor cells 'gravitate' towards each other?

In a popular article it is mentioned that in centrifugal experiments with cancer cells that When subjected to microgravity-conditions, the cancer cells were unable to sense each other and therefore ...
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50 views

Which chemokines are being produced by melanocytes?

I am looking into Vitiligo it's an autoimmune disease that results in apoptosis of melanocytes due to misfolded protein accumulation. It also dramatically increases breast cancer rates (600 times) ...
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34 views

Fluoroquinolone mitochondrial and genomic DNA adduct

What could be possible consequences of covalent bond mitochondrial and genomic DNA adduct by Fluoroquinolones, our study was done by Fluoroquinolone Toxicity Study NFP. All 50+ participates who took ...
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28 views

Why is CLL B-Cell leukemia t(12;21) more responsive to chemotherapy?

Chronic Lympoid Leukemia targeting B-Cell (with the particular translocation mutation on chromosome 12 and 21) is known to be more responsive to chemotherapy. Is there a known molecular mechanism for ...
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26 views

How does latency in carcinogenisis differ from the effect of chance?

Most chemically induced cancers seem to have a long latency between exposure to the carcinogen and expression of the disease. Mesothelioma typically 30-40 years, bladder cancer about 20 years, for ...
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30 views

What is(are) the mechanism(s) that stop cells from fusing in vivo?

I just learned about the phenomenon of 'cell fusion' in which two diploid somatic cells can combine into some aneuploid cell in vitro and proceed to proliferate in culture. Apparently this can even ...
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14 views

Treatment validation on mouse models

I am struggling to set up a project proposal for validation of a known treatment for metastatic colorectal cancer in mouse models. I want to see how SNPs in patients contribute to their drug ...
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25 views

Characterising mechanisms responsible for generating structural variants

I have a high-quality set of structural variant breakpoints from tumour/normal WGS data, and I am interested in digging into the various mechanisms that might be involved in each event. There are ...
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31 views

What is the best solvent for Mutagen X?

Many solvents can be used for mutagen X (3-chloro-4-(dichloromethyl)-5-hydroxy-5H-furan-2-one), however, long-term stability is not specified. Which would be the best solvent for long-term storage? ...
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98 views

How do neuroblastoma cells divide? Is it via mitosis?

My name is Daniel and I'm 17 years old. I am currently designing a study to investigate compounds that potentially increase the replication of neural cells. I will be using neuroblastoma cells and ...
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168 views

Why is RAS undruggable?

Why can't mutated RAS get inactivated by GTPase? Why don't we have any inhibitors for RAS-GTP binding? Why is RAS undruggable? How can mutated RAS be inactivated? I had been researching on the topic ...
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50 views

How does carcinoma enter into blood or lymphatic vessels?

When carcinoma begins to metastasize, it enters into blood vessel or lymphatic vessel to migrate to the site of metastasis. In that case, although I think breaking down the basement membrane is ...
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41 views

do cancer cells respond to EM fields?

Do cancer cells respond to electromagnetic fields? If so, can someone please provide reliable information as to how they behave in such fields? Do you suppose the growth rate to be affected in any way ...
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72 views

Do Tumor-Infiltrating T Cells Experience Any Prolonged Effects Due To Hypoxia After They Return To Normoxia?

Adoptive cell transfer (ACT) therapy using tumor-inflitrating lymphocytes (TIL) is at the cutting edge of immuno-oncology treatments involving metastatic melanoma and other indications (1). The idea ...
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90 views

Has Staphylococcus aureus ever been used against cancer?

Treating inoperable tumors with bacteria appears to be very effective, albeit being toxic to the patient as well. Has (live attenuated) Staphylococcus aureus ever been used against cancer? If the ...
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159 views

How to construct tumor phylogenetic tree?

I would like to know if anyone has tried any software that constructs tumor evolution trees where the trunks represent the common mutations and the private alterations are noted on each branch. I can ...
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51 views

Pathogenesis of Cardiac Atypia?

I am studying the pathogenesis of atypia in cardiac cells where the etiology is most commonly irritation or infection and where the precancerous risk depends on the context of diagnosis. This fact ...
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510 views

Where do I find microsatellite instability annotation for TCGA data

I have searched through the TCGA data portal but I was unable to find MSI annotation for TCGA Colon Adenocarcinoma (COAD) and Rectum Adenocarcinoma (READ) datasets. I am searching for the annotation ...
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961 views

Why do leukemia and lymphoma cause “night sweats”?

One of the symptoms of these blood cancers is sleep hyperhidrosis (aka night sweats). Also referred to as one of the B-symptoms, it may be used for prognosis. What is the the mechanism behind the ...
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170 views

Can a cell completely lose the ability to undergo apoptosis?

What I mean is - can a super-cancer cell completely lose the ability to kill itself, losing all apoptosis-related mechanisms and becoming eternally resistant to any drug that tries to induce apoptosis ...
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98 views

Absorbed dose from a CT scan with relation to radiation accidents

I read somewhere that the average CTDIvol in CT scans at hospitals is ~40 mGy. This translates to the 'radiation intensity' at the center of the person, and can also be roughly interpreted as an '...
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167 views

Cell Line With DNMT3a Mutation

I am looking for a cell line (preferably hematopoietic) that has an inactivating DNMT3a mutation. I have checked the Cancer Cell Line Encyclopedia but of all the hematopoietic cell lines I know I can'...
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Can photosyntetic cells be genetically modified to grow at a faster rate?

I hope the question is not silly, but I wonder if a sort of genetically modified plant "cancer" could be used for carbon sequestration. For example, cancer cells like HeLa have been reproduced in tons,...
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54 views

Superpatients for Cancer resistance

I was reading an article on MIT Technology review about superpatients for low cholesterol that got me thinking whether such patients exist for cancer. The article is http://www.technologyreview.com/...
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78 views

Cigarette consumption dose-response function WRT health outcomes

I'm curious how health risks (mortality, lifetime probability of cancer, etc) change with cigarette consumption. Specifically, treatring cigarette consumption like a continuous variable, rather than ...
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86 views

Cells with no apoptosis mechanism and their 'byproducts'

If a culture or sample of cells is such they all have no apoptosis mechanisms yet they have not been at present determined to be cancerous ; given such a cell culture is there a way to determine by ...
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119 views

Regarding benign tumors and what 'stops' them

Benign tumors can grow to dangerous size yet are they capable of metastisizing ; if not what stops this? Also with a benign tumor if you call its cells 'near' its edges its tumor 'cell wall' I was ...