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Questions tagged [cancer]

A malignant group of uncontrollably dividing cells that form a tumour. Questions regarding (proto)oncogenes and tumour-suppressor genes should also use this tag.

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Can a cancerous cell from outside cause cancer in a healthy person?

If a cancerous cell enters the body of a healthy person from someone else's blood or something, will that healthy person get cancer? In human beings.
Poin's user avatar
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1 answer
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Extremely rare occurence of Heart cancer?

The occurrence of Heart cancer (similar, but not the same as Rhabdomyosarcoma) is extremely rare, about 1 per year according to MayoClinic. The reason for this rarity is explained to be the post-...
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Can vitamin B17 cure cancer?

I have heard that a 'vitamin B17' can cure cancer, but that the medical industry never talks about it, since making it legal would cause them loss of billions. But I have never found a reliable report ...
superbug's user avatar
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22 votes
2 answers
4k views

Is it possible to make a vaccine against cancer?

If we can make RNA vaccines against COVID-19 and we know which errors in our DNA leads to different kinds of cancer, can we make a vaccine that will teach our immune system to detect and destroy ...
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21 votes
3 answers
1k views

Can plants get cancer?

I can't think of any reason why plants wouldn't be able to get cancer, but I've never heard of a plant growing a tumor. I've also never seen a plant with a noticeable abnormal growth. Can plants get ...
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Why should a tumor look like a crab?

Origin of the word "cancer" The disease was first called cancer by Greek physician Hippocrates (460-370 BC). He is considered the “Father of Medicine”. Hippocrates used the terms carcinos and ...
M.A.R.'s user avatar
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20 votes
3 answers
2k views

Why does UV radiation from the Sun cause skin cancer?

What is the specific mechanism makes non-ionizing UVA and UVB radiation carcinogenic? Can lower energy light, like visible light, be carcinogenic because of this mechanism, or is there some kind of ...
ayane_m's user avatar
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19 votes
2 answers
7k views

Why are organs not harvested from deceased cancer patients?

From my understanding, cancer is not contagious, and if a cancerous cell from a patient is introduced to a healthy person, then the immune system of the latter can destroy this cell. In such a case, ...
Harvey's user avatar
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17 votes
2 answers
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Why do most breast cancers occur in women?

According to Korde et al. (2010): Male breast cancer accounts for less than 1% of all cancers in men and less than 1% of breast cancers. This raises the question: Why do most breast cancers occur ...
Douglas S. Stones's user avatar
17 votes
1 answer
1k views

Contact Inhibition of Cell Division: Signaling Pathway

The following article refers to contact inhibition of cell division in epithelial cells, specifically MDCK cells: Collective and single cell behavior in epithelial contact inhibition. In their review ...
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15 votes
2 answers
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Looking for a cancer drug target database to guide sequencing of patient tumor DNA

I have a question I would like to pose to the community. I have recently received access to a bench-top ion torrent DNA sequencer. Our idea is to use this machine to sequence the DNA from patient’s ...
Alexander's user avatar
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14 votes
1 answer
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Can cancer grow forever if supplied with unlimited resources?

If somehow a human could give a tumor unlimited resources, would the cancer grow forever? It seems like it would until it gets so large that it physically affects vital organs. Is what would likely ...
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13 votes
3 answers
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Is cancer caused by vitamin B17 deficiency?

I have read in an article on the internet that cancer is caused due to deficiency of vitamin B17 which has been removed from our diets long ago in the western food. But some people say that vitamin ...
Mesentery's user avatar
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13 votes
3 answers
2k views

Are all carcinogens mutagens?

I assume that all carcinogens must be mutagens, but I've read that this is not the case. However, I can't find any good examples or an explanation of why it is not the case. How can a non-mutagenic ...
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13 votes
2 answers
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Could cancer be in itself a evolutionary process?

Could cancer be in itself a evolutionary process? Maybe in some way could it be a process of variation? Or would this idea be completely without support, if so, why? I don't mean that each case ...
John's user avatar
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How fast do cancer cells divide (compared to normal cells)?

This question suggests that we have, on average, 50-70 billion cell divisions per day. I just read that cancer cells divide more often and are therefore more prone to radiation. I am wondering, for ...
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2 answers
9k views

What are the differences between cancer and tumour?

What are the differences between cancer and tumour? I mean is it in the DNA or shape or something else... And how can a benign tumour turn into a malignant tumour? The body has a lot of tumours all ...
Malic Of Sdom's user avatar
12 votes
2 answers
9k views

Are all mutagens carcinogens?

Not all carcinogens are mutagens. Alcohol and estrogen, for example, does not damage DNA. It's one of the assumptions of the Ames test that mutagenicity implies carcinogenicity, but is this always ...
Resonating's user avatar
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12 votes
1 answer
549 views

Why do people with Down syndrome get fewer cancers?

I'm coming across some conflicting information regarding the correlation between cancer incidents and trisomy 21. I read a report from nature that discusses how Downs are only a tenth as likely to ...
rhill45's user avatar
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12 votes
3 answers
936 views

In a tumor, why hypoxic regions have access to glucose?

The Warburg effect is ubiquitous in cancer. It consists of the upregulation of glucose uptake, glycolysis, and subsequent lactate secretion, sometimes by over 200 times, in cancer cells as compared to ...
a06e's user avatar
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11 votes
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Have there been studies done to test Immortality of cancer cells in culture?

This website on cultured cancer cells () says cancer cells may be immortal. I am wondering if there has been any research done to find if cancer cells are really immortal. How old is the still ...
One Face's user avatar
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11 votes
1 answer
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What is the base cancer rate for an arbitrary carcinogen?

Are all carcinogens equally potent? Is the relationship between dose and probability of cancer roughly equal, or are there some carcinogens that provoke cancer significantly more than their cousins?
Chris Wenham's user avatar
11 votes
1 answer
388 views

Can mitochondria become cancerous?

Given that mitochondria have their own DNA and can replicate independently, can they ever become cancerous? For example, could a mutation in their DNA cause them to rapidly replicate, ultimately ...
F16Falcon's user avatar
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11 votes
3 answers
641 views

If Tumors have lots of mutations in them how is it the immune system can't detect them?

If a cancerous tumor has a lot of mutations in them why can't the immune system detect them? If a person has cancer could this somehow alter the person's immune system so it doesn't function ...
201044's user avatar
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10 votes
1 answer
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Are there any types of cancer that cause neurons to divide?

After birth neurons generally do not divide. But is there any specific type of rare cancer or tumour where neurons divide? And if there is such a cancer, then how is it possible for a neuron to regain ...
saptarshi's user avatar
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10 votes
1 answer
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Do larger multicellular organisms have an increased risk of mutation and thus cancer?

So I was thinking that if each cell has P(X) of becoming cancerous, then the chance of cancer is 1-((1-P(X))^n) where n is the number of cells in the organism. Since larger organisms have more cells ...
Zigu's user avatar
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10 votes
1 answer
4k views

Why might long telomeres be selected for in laboratory mice?

In a recent episode of The Portal, Eric Weinstein sits down with his brother Bret Weinstein to discuss Bret's Reserve-Capacity Hypothesis. It's an incredible story of scientific discovery and academic ...
aRockStr's user avatar
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10 votes
1 answer
248 views

Can a dividing cell that skipped DNA replication become cancerous?

Let's assume that a cell fails to replicate its DNA during the S Phase of the cell cycle. Let's also assume that the appropriate CDKs are inactive (perhaps due to mutation or lack of cyclin proteins ...
theforestecologist's user avatar
8 votes
6 answers
1k views

What is the lowest common denominator of cancer?

What is the lowest level attribute that all cancers share? Also, what is the highest level attributes that all cancers share?
David Walz's user avatar
8 votes
2 answers
4k views

Can cancer cells in the same person, organ, and origin have different DNA?

Is it possible for cells from the same tumor to have different genetic material, and if so, to what degree is it possible (how fast do they mutate) ?
jhon's user avatar
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8 votes
2 answers
90 views

All UniprotIDs of a cancer pathway

I need to download all uniprotIDs of a cancer pathway, say the AKT Signaling. It may be super easy, but I don't know which resource to look at since it is a new field. How/where do I find these?
El Dude's user avatar
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8 votes
1 answer
134 views

Why doesn't yearly screening for lung cancer decrease mortality rates?

In a large trial, screening yearly for lung cancer hasn't reduced mortality rates. Why is this? Isn't cancer best treatable when caught early? Is this because lung cancer is hard to treat anyway, ...
Dokkat's user avatar
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8 votes
1 answer
3k views

Can bacteria, viruses, and cancer cells be destroyed by resonance?

Radiotherapy has been used to treat cancer. Can the resonances by coordinated electromagnetic waves (and/or other forms of waves), of various frequencies, amplitudes and pulse rates, directed from ...
Chong Lip Phang's user avatar
8 votes
0 answers
192 views

Why don’t all HPV strains cause cancers?

There are roughly a dozen high risk HPV strains responsible for cervical cancer. These strains promote hyperplasia of infected cells by encoding E6 and E7, which potently antagonize tumor suppressor ...
哲煜黄's user avatar
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7 votes
2 answers
2k views

Isn't biological immortality strictly speaking impossible?

This question relates to both immortal cells such as cancers and organisms like the Hydra genus. Isn't it technically impossible for these "immortal" biological systems to live forever, even ...
Koen vd H's user avatar
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7 votes
4 answers
423 views

Cancer biology: Can tumors form from cells that are genetically identical to non-cancerous cells?

Can a tumor begin to form without any genetic mutations? I'm specifically interested in a tumor which could later lead to cancer.
Crazy's user avatar
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7 votes
2 answers
639 views

Can oncogenesis happen without apoptosis pathway being affected?

Has there ever been incidences of one or more cancerous cells having all it's cell-death pathways and apoptosis mechanisms intact and functional?
user128932's user avatar
7 votes
2 answers
1k views

How similar are Circulating Tumor Cells and Cancer Stem Cells?

Circulating Tumor Cells (CTCs) are linked with metastasis and their presence can be used to indicate the onset of metastatic cancer. Likewise, the Cancer Stem Cell (CSC) hypothesis suggests that ...
bobthejoe's user avatar
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7 votes
1 answer
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Why does fever above 102 herald a cancer patient's death?

I was recently intrigued by a longtime hospice nurse's observation that her cancer patients die a different death than her Alzheimer's, multiple sclerosis, heart failure and COPD patients. She stated ...
TomBeatrous's user avatar
7 votes
1 answer
191 views

Treatment of cancer

In treatment of cancer, radiation is given, but radiation can also be the cause of cancer. In the drugs of chemotherapy it is written that it is highly carcinogenic. Then why are such methods ...
Mesentery's user avatar
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7 votes
1 answer
468 views

Are low-intensity radio-waves carcinogenic?

A recent review article, Oxidative mechanisms of biological activity of low-intensity radiofrequency radiation reached a surprising conclusion our analysis demonstrates that low-intensity RFR [...
Ein Doofus's user avatar
7 votes
1 answer
171 views

Y Chromosome in Ovary Cancer Data

I have been analyzing TCGA Ovary Cancer data. In Somatic Mutation data, there is data of mutations in all the chromosomes (1-22 and X), but amazingly, I have found one (just one) row of Y Chromosome ...
Failed Scientist's user avatar
7 votes
1 answer
130 views

What are the biological mechanisms behind the increase in cancer risk and alcohol consumption?

Alcohol consumption is known to be a risk factor for developing cancer. Compared to obvious causes like tobacco where one is exposed to known carcinogens, I don't see an obvious mechanism by which ...
Mad Scientist's user avatar
6 votes
3 answers
408 views

Is solving cancer required in order to avoid aging?

When the telomerase enzyme is not active the telomere shortens every time the cell duplicates leading to a reproductive limit (Hayflicks limit). On one hand this is a believed reason for aging. On the ...
brillout's user avatar
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6 votes
4 answers
188 views

Can a tumor produce something not currently found in our own bodies?

While speaking with my co-workers, the topic of tumors growing things came up. The examples were (and backed by images) of tumors growing a tooth, hair, and sometimes even more complex objects such ...
David Peterman's user avatar
6 votes
2 answers
294 views

Why do epithelial cells arrest in response to serum?

Primary epithelial cells, for example human mammary epithelium, fail to proliferate (arrest) in serum-containing medium. Therefore, a common growth medium for epithelium contains pituitary extract ...
Roland's user avatar
  • 5,725
6 votes
4 answers
473 views

Why do we think chronic inflammation can cause cancer?

Why do we think chronic inflammation can cause cancer? I know the pathway is not fully understood, but what makes scientists believe that inflammation causes cancer?
Kirby's user avatar
  • 1,319
6 votes
1 answer
9k views

What does it mean when a patient suffering from malignant tumor (cancer) has been declared cured?

Comment by Anongoodnurse, has made me curious as to what a doctor means when (s)he says "The cancer is cured" to a patient. My idea up till this point (based on what I read and what I learned in my ...
One Face's user avatar
  • 3,082
6 votes
1 answer
482 views

Can radiation therapy cause cancer?

Radiation therapy is a very popular cancer treatment method. But can it have any risk for make a different cancer? Because i think that radiation exposure can make DNA mutation and thus increase the ...
LeDuc's user avatar
  • 219
6 votes
2 answers
146 views

Is the sun's damage to skin sufficient to warrant protection anytime the average person goes outside or just for extended periods?

According to the American Academy of Dermatology website, Everyone needs sunscreen Sunscreen should be used every day if you will be outside. The sun emits harmful ultraviolet (UV) rays year round. ...
Stan Shunpike's user avatar

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