Questions tagged [cell-biology]

The study of cells and their physiological properties, structure, environmental interaction, division, life cycle, and death, as well as the organelles they contain. Also known as cytology.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
0
votes
0answers
8 views

Allelic dominance and recessiveness [duplicate]

What is the reason for the allelic dominance and recessiveness of a gene? Is it all about the chance or probability of getting the fusion of a particular character ? So how can be there a dominance ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

E. coli & aspartate

I am familiar with the linkage between aspartate/ligand binding, receptor methylation, and flagellar behavior re. style of locamotion, but I do not know what the bacterium does with the aspartate it ...
0
votes
1answer
25 views

Did the first cell self-replicate or was it multiple first cells?

We're almost sure by now that the first cell was born in a some kind of underwater vents environment which harvested all the necessary conditions for it to exist. However, did the first cell self-...
1
vote
0answers
50 views

Why don’t plant cells need centrioles? [duplicate]

I’ve just learned about cell division and I noted that plant cells don’t have centrioles but still undergo cell division. I’ve read a few documents about it and wondered why plant cells don't have ...
2
votes
1answer
126 views

What will happen if mitochondria had a structure like lysosomes?

I wanted to know an explanation how the structure of mitochondria affects its function. Therefore, how would it turn out if its structure is like the structure of lysosomes, what is going to happen?
0
votes
0answers
18 views

Immunological response to antibodies? Streptokinase?

Why is it not recommended to use streptokinase in the event of a second clot shortly after the first? In this graph below is an illustration on the amount of antibodies to streptokinase in the blood ...
1
vote
0answers
14 views

Is SCNT possible with only the nucleus of a somatic cell (rather than a whole somatic cell)?

The following figure from Life: The Science of Biology (11th edition) explains how SCNT (somatic cell nuclear transfer) was used in the cloning of Dolly: (The original paper about cloning Dolly - ...
1
vote
0answers
4 views

What renders a cytoplasm basophilic?

I know that being basophilic or acidophilic corresponds to affinity to certain dyes used in microscopy. What i want to know is what characteristics of the cytoplasm can we infer from its basophilic ...
-4
votes
0answers
24 views

Is there a gene(s) that expresses RNA polymerase I, II or III enzymes? [closed]

I believe the answer is no. Polymerase enzymes evolved from RMS World. Is that corrrect?
-1
votes
0answers
34 views

Where is the greater diversity of cell types: in animals or in plants?

A 2011 paper from the Department of Biology, Dalhousie University in Nova Scotia (table of estimates, full article) suggests that there may be around 25 times more species of animals than there are ...
-1
votes
0answers
10 views

Cell lineage tracing, commercial products

Is anybody familiar with any companies that have commercialized the ability to trace cell lineages? In line with the following methodologies: https://news.harvard.edu/gazette/story/2018/08/genetic-...
-1
votes
0answers
28 views

Is it possible for mitosis to occur in haploid (n) and triploid (3n) cells? [on hold]

I understood that mitosis can occur in haploid cells and for many haploid cells it is the main process through which the cell can divide. However I'm unsure about triploid cells.
3
votes
1answer
90 views

What Ultimately Controls DNA Transcription?

Transcription of DNA and further splicing of mRNA is regulated by various transcription factors, small nuclear RNAs and so on; similarly such related mechanisms as transposition of transposons. All ...
0
votes
0answers
11 views

Species specific White Blood Cells (WBC) composition

In our ongoing immunology undergrad course I learnt that neutrophil primarily fights off bacterial infection and lymphocyte is produced in response to viral infection. I also learnt that neutrophil ...
7
votes
1answer
93 views

How does a cell distinguish left from right?

Although the human body is mostly left-right symmetrical, it consistently has asymetries. The heart is consistently slightly to the left side of the body. The liver is consistently on the right side. ...
2
votes
0answers
17 views

What is the end-point of material from an apoptotic cell, after phagocytosis?

Apoptosis occurs. The organelles and interior material form apoptotic bodies that are packed in vesicles. The cell membrane breaks apart (cell no longer exists) and apoptotic bodies enter the ...
2
votes
1answer
49 views

Non-nucleated cell-like population with RNA

We're working on invertebrate hemolymph (blood) and we have found with flow cytometry (staining with DRAQ5) a cell-like population without nucleus but it has RNA production. Does anyone any ...
0
votes
0answers
29 views

Xylem vessels, lignin, wood

I learnt that lignin impregnates xylem cells, causing the cytoplasm to die due to the inability of water and nutrients to pass freely, hence creating hollow tubes adapted to transport materials. This ...
0
votes
0answers
10 views

semantic similarity measurement for cell line ontologies

I have a set of cell line pairs and I want to know to what extent the pairs are similar based on their ontologies. The problem I have is that I have found a Python library called Fastsemsim, but it ...
0
votes
1answer
31 views

Protein inhibitory process

I usually find substances that activates proteins, like ApoA-I, but I don't find substances that inhibit it. So in an experimental design, could I consider the absence of a drug that directly acts ...
2
votes
1answer
48 views

What would the ploidy of a multinucleate cell be?

If we have a haploid organism, and it undergoes karyokinesis without cytokinesis, would the organism be considered haploid or diploid?
0
votes
0answers
10 views

Why do people use J2 viruses for macrophage immortalization?

I've been trying to figure out how to go about immortalizing some primary alveolar macrophages harvested from mice. What I am seeing in the literature is that it seems like people have been using a ...
0
votes
1answer
28 views

Does anyone know a good pancreatic-cancer metastasis cell line?

Researching about pancreatic cancer. We have mostly "main-tumor" cell lines in our lab, and I´m currently looking for cell lines originating from metastases (liver, lung, etc.). Does anyone know a ...
0
votes
0answers
14 views

Can water travel through glycoprotein cell walls?

I'm a bit confused as to why the protist, Chlamydomonas, has contractile vacuoles if it has a cell wall like this. Is the glycoprotein still permeable to water?
1
vote
2answers
60 views

What is the subcellular location of synthesis of non-essential amino-acids?

What is location of non-essential amino acids synthesis in a cell? Is it some specific organelle? And what is the gene driver behind this? I thought the whole point of DNA is coding for how to ...
0
votes
1answer
29 views

Can I use a basic compound microscope to analyze the ploidy of plant chromosomes?

So, I'm not really any kind of trained botanist. But I do have two things: some dandelion seeds from France, and, collecting dust in my garage along with related accessories, this thing. Normally, ...
0
votes
0answers
24 views

How to troubleshoot in vitro formaldehyde fixation for nucleosomes?

For an experiment, I am trying to fix the mononucleosomes (100ng) using formaldehyde as crosslinking agent in HEPES buffer. I have been using 2% formaldehyde in a reaction buffer containing 1mM EDTA, ...
3
votes
0answers
41 views

Are there gaps in what our ears can hear?

I know about the hair cells in our Cochlea and it is the movement of the fluid that makes them vibrate. And it is this that activates the transmission of electrical signals to the brain that become ...
1
vote
0answers
25 views

How do receptors lose their sensitivity?

Recently, I learned that one of the causes of Type II diabetes is that insulin receptors on cell surfaces lose their sensitivity due to long-term high exposure to insulin (which occurs as a result of ...
1
vote
0answers
28 views

What is the difference between protein translated by a free ribosome and protien translated by a ribosome attached to endoplasmic reticulem? [closed]

There are protiens translated by free ribosomes and proteins translated by attached ribosomes. But how do these two types of protein differ from each other? I am just talking about a eukaryotic cell. ...
0
votes
0answers
27 views

What was the cause of some egg-laying animals evolution to animal-laying?

Is there a specific reason for this evolution? Are no egg-laying animals more complex beings so their embryonic development requires more time and better nutrition conditions?
2
votes
0answers
48 views

Why does K+ going out of the cell cause hyperpolarization?

I'm really confused by how the terms Hyperpolarization and Depolarization are used in Cell biology and hope somebody can enlighten me hopefully. Here's what they mean for me so far: Depolarization ...
1
vote
1answer
38 views

Number of dopaminergic neurons in VTA

Do you know an authoritative source for the approximate number of dopaminergc cells in the ventral tegmental area (VTA)? Ideally I would like to know this for mice, rats, as well as humans, but one ...
1
vote
1answer
60 views

Why do many cells together survive better than one cell alone?

I know that one cell with no ECM is subject to anoikis. That's why in general one cell alone not in its environment is dying. But are there advantages for a cell to live close to other cells even of ...
0
votes
1answer
13 views

Salt Bridge for Microbial Fuel Cell: Full or Partly Full?

I'm making a microbial fuel cell out of benthic mud and salt water in containers. My salt bridge will be made of agar and table salt solidified in PVC pipes. Does the salt bridge connecting the anode (...
1
vote
1answer
63 views

Does a cell suspend or exit cell cycle at G0?

In an exam, there was one question which asked whether the cell exits or suspends cell cycle at G0 phase. I answered that it exits cell cycle but the official answer key says it suspends cell cycle. ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

Can a lentivirus expressed protein that is undetectable by western blot be detected by BioID?

Cloned a single herpesviral gene into pCDH-EF!-GFP and see phenotypic effect on cells of interest and viral gene transcripts BUT unable to detect ANY protein using HRP boosted western blot. Even with ...
0
votes
0answers
21 views

What does it mean for a gametocyte to “reprogram” the genes inside of it?

I am aware that frequently clones have genetic defects not present in the donor organism, even though the two are genetically identical. The reason for this is that apparently the enclosing gametocyte ...
2
votes
1answer
48 views

Are epigenetic modifications the most stable mechanisms for cell differentiation?

Wondering what the general take is on what are the molecular mechanisms that are mostly responsible for cell type differentiation stability; ie, for a cell's identity to actually become 'locked in' ...
2
votes
1answer
79 views

Can radiation exposure cause cancer later in life even if no traces of radioactive material are present in the body anymore?

I had a long-lasting debate with a friend of mine about the Fukushima incident. The question that we tried to solve was if radiation or toxin exposure can cause cancer later in life even if no ...
23
votes
3answers
4k views

Are cells guaranteed to get at least one mitochondrion when they divide?

If mitochondria exist at random within a cell, isn't there a possibility that cell division will result in a daughter cell with no mitochondria? If not, what is the process for guaranteeing at least ...
0
votes
0answers
23 views

Insight on HPV vaccine to prevent/control reactivation of latent infections in those already infected

Some women experience reactivation of HPV infection in their 50's due to weakened immune system and weakened immune memory. Is it outside the realm of possibility that giving the HPV vaccine to those ...
1
vote
0answers
48 views

Protein misfolding [closed]

Protein misfolding is usually prevented by molecular chaperons. Rarely, the chaperons are not able to prevent the misfolding as a result of which the infectous molecules called prions will form. My ...
0
votes
0answers
14 views

How are codocytes or target cells formed?

How are codocytes or target cells formed in conditions like Thalassemia? And why do they appear like a target(as in why is there a central red surrounded by pallor surrounded by red?)
2
votes
1answer
63 views

What does substrate mean?

I have been reading some literature on measurements related to biofilms. In some articles the word "substrate" seems to stand for the material on which a biofilm is growing. In other articles, it ...
0
votes
0answers
51 views

Stopping all intracellular activity in a reversible fashion

I have never studied biology but the following question seems meaningful to me. Suppose I take a cell, not that of a unicellular organism, but a human cell. Normally, there are some intracellular ...
0
votes
0answers
13 views

Endocytic pathway: Macropinocytosis

So I'm trying to understand this phrase: Unlike other endocytic pathways, macropinocytosis is acutely induced by growth factors From the following paper The 4 endocytic pathways I know of are ...
-1
votes
1answer
71 views

Chargaff Rules (confusion) [closed]

A professor of mine wrote that: $\frac{A+T}{G+C}$ is constant in double stranded DNA of different origin. However The Chargaff rules state that due to base pairing in the DNA it holds that : $A=T$ ...
2
votes
2answers
76 views

Do histones constitute the largest proportion of the protein in chromosomes at mitosis?

Do histones contribute more (by mass) than non-histone proteins in the chromosomes formed during mitosis?