Questions tagged [central-nervous-system]

The complex of nerve tissues including the brain and spinal cord, but excluding the peripheral nervous system.

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How are targets formed for axon growth cones (CNS)?

Axons have growth cones which find a route to their target using multiple methods (guidepost cells, attraction to target, etc...). My question is, what is the process that actually forms the target? ...
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CNS lymphatic vessels around ventricles lat et 4th?

I am searching for precise locations of the lymphatic vessels of the CNS based on the applications of the article here. However, I did not find any when having a focus on the immediate region around ...
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Is the CNS vascularized?

I was under the impression that the CNS is never penetrated by blood vessels, which explains why one never sees them in histological samples. However a google search reveals I am wrong. So can ...
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Physiologically, how can stress/anxiety cause neuropathy?

According to the Mayo Clinic, stress/anxiety can cause "pins and needles" (neuropathy) sensations all over the body. But how can this be? My understanding of the sensory pathway is that sensory ...
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Why are higher doses of atropine required to produce central effects?

Reason given in my book is restricted entry into the brain..is it something to do with the chemisty?
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Mild introduction to selective advantage of intelligence/nervous systems in animals?

I have a general understanding of why intelligence, i.e. nervous systems in animals, is advantageous: processing information allows an animal to adapt to its environment dynamically and perform ...
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Any known values of density for spinal cord (pig or human)?

Need to know the density of spinal cord tissue to evaluate the shear modulus from ultrasound elastography (shear wave velocity) measurements, but need the density of the tissue to compute this. I am ...
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An introduction to nuclei in the pons?

I have a couple of questions regarding the nuclei in the pons, thus I figured it would be best to frame the main question in the way that I did. My main question, however, is whether the basal ...
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Nervous stimuli and neurotransmitters and impacts

As far my knowledge, in body parts generally **acetacholine ** is the neurotransmitter. Which is responsible for most nervous impulses. Consider a body part, say, foot. Only one nerve reaches here. ...
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Why are interneurons needed in the spinal cord for polysynaptic reflexes and somatosensory tracts to the brain?

The single explanation I found for the polysynaptic reflex is that the interneuron diverges into more pathways, such as the efferent motor neuron, the inhibitory neuron to the opposite extensor muscle,...
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Imidazoline receptor agonist in clonidine?

I am thinking which pathway is more important in hypertension, ADHD and withdrawal of clonidine: alpha-2 agonist imidazoline receptor agonist (maybe) Alpha-2 is the classical one. Pubchem starts to ...
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How do nerve impulses travel so quickly?

Nerve impulses must travel incredibly fast to achieve the functions they do. However, I have been taught that sodium ions move down the axons by diffusion (thus causing depolarisation of the next part ...
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Does every axon in a fascicle have its own soma?

If every axon has a soma/neuron, and a fascicle is a group of axons, then why cant I find any images of a group of soma connected to a fascicle?
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Stem cells therapy for stroke via thecal sac?

According to this video posted below, stem cells for stroke patients can be induced to thecal sack, below the spinal cord. Those stem cells would make their way up to the brain. https://youtu.be/...
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Are ipratropium and tolterodine parasympatholytic?

They are nonselective cholinoblockers and antimuscarinic. Other cholinoblockers of parasympaticus, which I know, are parasympatholytic such as atropine, butylscopolamine, trihexyphenidyl, titropium ...
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Correlation between height and nervous system response

The basis of this observation is purely anecdotal, although I do believe it holds significant weight. I am rather tall(197cm) and am quite the slow typist. However, everyone of my friends or ...