Questions tagged [chromosome]

A single piece of DNA coiled and organized along with RNA and proteins found in the cell.

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46
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Why is polyploidy lethal for some organisms while for others is not?

Polyploidy is the multiplication of number of chromosomal sets from 2n to 3n (triploidy), 4n (tetraploidy) and so on. It is quite common in plants, for example many crops like wheat or Brassica forms. ...
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Are human chromosomes connected or separate molecules?

Do the 46 human chromosomes form a single unbroken DNA helix? Or is it rather that a human's genome consists of 46 disconnected helices? If it is the former, does the common numbering scheme for ...
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2answers
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Is there an advantage to linear chromosomes?

The DNA copying enzymes have a hard time working to the end of a chromosome. For circular chromosomes this is not a problem, since there is not a sharp 'end'. However, for a linear chromosome, without ...
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Why is Chromosome 1 called Chromosome 1?

Chromosome 1 is the designation for the largest human chromosome. Humans have two copies of chromosome 1, as they do with all of the autosomes, which are the non-sex chromosomes. Chromosome 1 spans ...
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Are there examples of cells with more than one nucleus?

I've always wondered why cells have only one nucleus, as having multiple would seemingly prevent mutation. Are there examples of organisms with multiple nucleuses? If not, is there a reason?
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Do men and women have the same number of genes?

As far as I know, humans have 23 pairs of chromosomes, each one which contains a particular amount of genes. But in the "last" pair, men have a XY pair chromosome, and women have a XX pair chromosome. ...
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3answers
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Is the size of the genome across species roughly the same?

Chromosome number differs across species. Is the amount of DNA comparable between organisms, just being split into smaller chunks in those species with more chromosomes, or do species have different ...
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Evolutionarily speaking, why do humans have 46 chromosomes

In humans, each cell normally contains 23 pairs of chromosomes, for a total of 46. Monkeys, chimpanzees, and Apes have 24 pairs (twenty-four pairs), for a total of 48. What caused humans to have 46? ...
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1answer
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Does every mitochondrion in a cell contain the same DNA?

I know that mitochondria of eukaryotes have their own DNA, more similar to that of bacteria than to the rest of the cell's DNA. I also know that a cell can have plenty of mitochondria, and I ...
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1answer
530 views

What limits chromosomal length?

What are the upper and lower limits for chromosome length? Are these limits different in different species or kingdoms? If there is any limit, which cellular or molecular factors are reasons?
12
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1answer
867 views

Why does size decrease across the sequence of human chromosomes?

The following graph shows a decrease in the number of base pairs per chromosome across the sequential set of human chromosomes: Is this because chromosomes were originally numbered by their size on ...
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4answers
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How does the molecular machinery choose where to cut a chromosome for recombination?

I'm wondering about a few technicalities of crossover in meiosis. The point of crossover is to create new chromosomes that don't have the same allele combinations as the original two chromosomes. ...
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Do single crossovers occur in circular polynucleotides?

Single crossovers in circular pieces of DNA do not seem to be a big topic, because if they happened, they would lead to a kind of combined chromosome with two inner strands and one large outer strand. ...
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Why does human chromosome 19 have the second highest number of protein-coding genes?

While chromosome 19 only is the 19th largest autosomal chromosome, it contains 1440 protein-coding genes, and thus has the second highest number of protein-coding genes of any human chromosome. For ...
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1answer
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Which of the two chromosomes in a pair is expressed?

I have completely dummy question. I have 23 pairs of chromosomes in the cells 23 single coming from my mother and 23 single from my father. So how my cell choose which chromosome, mother's or father'...
9
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1answer
100 views

What causes cells to inactivate one X-chromosome?

Normally, when a cell has two X-chromosomes (female genome), one is randomly inactivated. How does the cell detect that there are two X-chromosomes in the first place? Is there some kind of protein ...
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How do chromosome pairs get “paired up” for protein synthesis?

If my understanding is correct, during interphase a normal human cell will have 46 chromosomes scattered about in the cell nucleus. These chromosomes can be thought of as pairs: there are two copies ...
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1answer
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What determines the number of chromosomes an organism carries?

This is an extension of this question about What limits chromosomal length?. I am wondering what could be the specific reasons behind the number of chromosomes an organism carries. In other words, ...
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Do the eggs for larger litters come from the same meiosis events, or different ones?

There are some species of animals that give birth to more than one pup at a time. In these species, are the fertilized eggs all from one or a limited group of meiosis processes, or are they from ...
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1answer
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Why is polyploidy much more common in plants than in animals? [duplicate]

There are very few animals with polyploidy like salamanders. Why is it that polyploidy is so uncommon in animals? On the other hand there are numerous examples of polyploid plants. If ut something to ...
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2answers
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What effect does the Barr body have, in relation to female Turner syndrome?

Why do persons with Turner syndrome have developmental abnormalities, when normal XX-females do not, even though they only have 1 active X chromosome? From what I know, one X-chromosome is ...
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4answers
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Chromosomes are of different size but why do all chromosomes have similar GC percentage?

When I browsed NCBI I saw a pattern: even if the chromosome sizes, number of genes, and number of proteins are different, GC% in chromosomes tend to be similar. The examples are linked below. Yeast, ...
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Finding the number of chromosomes of an organism

For a school project I need to find the number of chromosomes of an organism (specifically the adelie penguin, Pygoscelis adeliae). After several internet searches and a look through the encyclopedia ...
7
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1answer
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Are recessive, deleterious alleles less common on the X chromosome than the autosomes in humans?

As there is a potential for them to be more readily purged in hemizygous males (and in cell lineages in females with the deleterious-allele-bearing chromosome activated), I would expect the frequency ...
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1answer
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Chromosome picture, how to interpret?

In this guide i was reading for annotations, there is a diagram of chromosomes of D.mel, I am confused as to why the chromosomes are all attached to one another, is this picture taken in a certain ...
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1answer
125 views

How does chromosome fusion get fixed in the population?

It's well known that one of human chromosomes is the result of fusion between two chromosomes in a primate ancestor. If we put anthropocentrism aside, it becomes clear that fusion events happened a ...
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1answer
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Why is it harder to sequence plant genomes than animal genomes?

Plants seem to be less complex organisms than animals, but despite that there are less plant genomes sequenced. Is that because plant genomes are more complex, for example in terms of regulatory ...
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1answer
436 views

Why are mice with a single X chromosome and no Y chromosome males?

I was searching online and I read this article Mice can be male without Y chromosome and this is a part of it: The experiments demonstrate that there are multiple ways to make males, says Richard ...
6
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1answer
165 views

Why are X-linked illnesses less common in females if females have X-chromosome inactivation anyway?

I have read this post but am still slightly confused about this. Do tissues in the human body not all develop from the same cell(s) in the embryo? If so, I do not see how the cell 'mosaic' would be ...
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1answer
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Number of spindle fibres during Metaphase?

During metaphase, the chromosomes are arranged on the equatorial plate and are attached to spindle fibres. After S phase, can the cell be said to attain the configuration of 4n? Also, during ...
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Chromosome 2 fusion?

I read this article by Jeffrey Tomkins and Jerry Bergman claiming to debunk chromosome 2 fusion. Is there anything wrong with these conclusions? " 1.The reputed fusion site is located in a peri-...
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1answer
902 views

What phenotypes can arise from gender-related aneuploidy?

Humans normally have 46 chromosomes (two copies - one from each parent - of each of the 24 chromosomes: [1:22] + [XX or XY]). Aneuploidy is an abnormal number of chromosomes - Down's syndromes is an ...
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1answer
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How much DNA of Albert Einstein is recoverable?

Since there seem to be five biological descendants of Albert Einstein, and the original chromosomes of him distributed among them ... Is it possible to recover enough DNA of an individual from his ...
5
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3answers
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How many recombination events are there per generation in humans?

I'm looking for a reference that tells me how many recombenation events occur in humans from one generation to the next. Assuming that the human genome is a 3.3 GigaBases long DNA sequence, how many ...
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The human has 46 double chromosomes or simple chromosomes?

What I mean: does the human cell have 46 of these: or 46 of these: Thank you in advance.
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2answers
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How was the Huntington's disease gene's location found?

I read in the book "Why we get sick." by Nesse and Williams that: Steady detective work and fabulous luck have enabled geneticists to pinpoint the Huntington's gene on the short arm of chromosome ...
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1answer
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Chromosome and chromatid numbers during cell cycle phases

A diploid cell in G1 has 6 chromosomes. How many chromosomes and how many chromatids are present in each of the following stages? Here is what I am guessing G1: 6 chromosomes ; 6 chromatids G2: 6 ...
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1answer
879 views

How does a tiger have stripes?

A vague question, but let me try to explain. My friend explained to me that in females, some cells use one X chromosome, while all others use the other X chromosome. This can result in some ...
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1answer
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What does it mean to “map the human genome”

I know some elementary chemistry and biology. I also think I know what a gene is (it's a sequence of DNA which encodes a particular protein). I also know that on a chromosome there are sections of DNA ...
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1answer
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Examples of animals with different number of chromosomes that can interbreed?

When I was first started to write this question, I wanted to know how species evolve to have a different chromosomal arrangement, such as having two pairs of chromosomes instead of one? However, I ...
5
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1answer
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Is there a practical upper limit to ploidy?

In my AP Biology class, we were discussing polyploidy, specifically, its deleterious nature in mammals and its prevalence in plants. We also learned that commercial crops, especially fruit, are often ...
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2answers
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What are centromeres *really*?

I've gathered that a centromere is a a region* where the DNA is bundles up even tighter (around protein different to Histone) and chromatids are 'joined'. However I'm still mostly in the dark ...
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1answer
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Why was polyploidy not lethal in certain octodontid rodents?

As discussed in Why is polyploidy lethal for some organisms while for others is not?, polyploidy is normally lethal in mammals. However, two species of Octodontidae (South American rodents), are ...
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1answer
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Clarification on the “orientation” of chromosomal rearrangements

I need some clarifications on the concept of "orientation" in case of chromosomal rearrangements. Given a deletion event on a chromosome for example, is the resulting DNA at the breakpoint always in ...
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1answer
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What is the most genetically simple organism except viruses?

What is the most genetically simple organism (except viruses) on this planet? By simple I mean the least number of genes.
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1answer
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Does DNA analysis allow determining amount of chromosomes?

Nowadays it is possible to sequence the DNA of extinct species, such as the Neanderthals, the Denisovans, and others. Is it possible to determine, solely from the sequenced DNA or from known bone ...
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1answer
750 views

Is complete linkage found in all four chromosomes or only Y-chromosome of Drosophila? [duplicate]

Male Drosophila shows complete linkage. Is it observed for all four chromosomes or only the Y chromosome?
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4answers
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Collective name for the X- and Z-chromosomes

Chromosomes are grouped as sex chromosomes or autosomes, with the X, Y, Z and W all falling in to the former category. The Z and X are present both in the homogametic and heterogametic sexes, and the ...
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1answer
102 views

Is there a link between autoimmune diseases and X-chromosome inactivation?

I was reading about the necessity of niche formations to adequate development of blood progenitors and this idea reminded me of the patchy inactivation of the X chromosome which followed that maybe, ...
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1answer
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How does DNA from sperm fuse with DNA in egg?

I see this statement all the time "half of our DNA (23 chromosomes) are from mom and 23 are from dad". Fine, but which chromosomes in our nucleus are from each parent? When I think of nucleus (before ...

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