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Questions tagged [dna]

Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the carrier of genetic information, including for all known living organisms. The only known exceptions are RNA viruses.

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DNA of identical twins

I read an article which says that identical twins have 100% similarity between their DNA, but they have different fingerprints. Does that mean the DNA is different in the fingers? What body features ...
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How do mutations with very little fitness benefit get fixed?

I have one little issue with evolutionary theory that I have not been able to understand. Suppose genetic mutations happen from generation to generation. Nevertheless, from one generation to the next ...
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Is it possible to fuse DNA from two sperms into one sperm?

Is it possible to fuse the DNA of two genetically different sperms into one singular sperm? In theory, half of the number of chromosomes in a normal sperm would come from one sperm and the other half ...
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What tests are used to identify biological sisters? [closed]

What sort of tests are used to identify biological sisters? I have a sister that is a user on this site but we were separated when she was two years old. Is there a test that can be taken to prove ...
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How to convert enrichment/depletion to frequency for comparing deep sequencing to sequence profile?

I have two datasets, from different sources, that I need to compare. The first set is deep sequencing results of a directed evolution experiment, where I have the naive library and selected library ...
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How dangerous can it be to publish your DNA (biologically)? [closed]

I am from India. The government here is presenting a bill related to DNA. According to the said bill, the government will collect the DNA(s) of the criminals, suspects, some accused men/women and the ...
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Why Only DNA can Contain Hereditary Material?

Well I'm well aware that it is proven that DNA contains genetic material via transformation and Hershey-Chase Experiment of T2 bacteriophage. Still I was wondering what is the reason only DNA ...
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Double stranded RNA Single stranded DNA

I have seen in textbooks referring to ds RNA and ssDNA. How a RNA can be double stranded and likewise how a DNA can single stranded and if they do exist why are there names not interchanged?
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Improving DNA quality and yield from stool samples

I prepared genomic DNA from pig stools but the concentration was very low — about 3~4 ng/µl, when I measured it using nanodrop. The A260/A280 and ...
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Does the DNA stick to surfaces we touch?

In case of robbery, the police visit the robbery scene and collect some samples like foot print or any item suspected to have been touched by the robber. The sample is then taken to laboratory for DNA ...
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Alignment sample of DNA collected from the crime scene and sample DNA collected from suspect

At a crime scene where DNA sample is collected, can smith-waterman algorithm be used to determine alignment between the DNA sample collected from the crime scene and the DNA sample of the suspect ?
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What causes skewed lanes in a DNA gel electrophoresis experiment?

In gel electrophoresis, what causes effects like these (see column 11 in the first one, and column 6 in the second)? (These images were samples that I took from an online activity we did for class)...
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What is the expected amount of DNA shared by first cousins and the people between them in a family tree?

What is the expected amount of DNA that is shared by all of the people between first cousins, including the first cousins, in a family tree?
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Design rules for DNA linkers

I want to use double stranded DNA linkers to physically bind two "things" together, by grafting ssDNA on each one of them and using DNA hybridization as the locking mechanism. I do not expect the ...
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Do telomeres appear at just one end of the chromosome?

I have just studied DNA Replication for my Biology Class and I have this question that leaves me stuck, though I have tried to figure it out myself. During telomere replication, I am aware Telomerase ...
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658 views

Ribosomal Turing Machines, DNA/RNA computation

I'm a computer science guy, recently crossing over to do some research in computational biology on RNA secondary structure prediction. While looking through the materials I got a crazy idea, what if ...
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Heat shock vs electroporation

I've been transforming E. coli via heat shock in order to insert oligonucleotides (around 50 nt); however, none of my experiments have given positive results so far. I begin to question the efficiency ...
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Will DNA nanostructures be useful for medical applications?

There is a lot of work being done on developing small nanomechanical structures and even small nanomechanical actuators built with DNA. I have heard researchers motivate this research with claims ...
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Observed to Expected CpG

Observed to Expected CpG is calculated as below : Obs/Exp CpG = Number of CpG * N / (Number of C * Number of G) where N = length of sequence. I also don't ...
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Is it possible in modern biology to make any person's identical twin (or genetical clone) using his DNA?

I was told by a Biotech professor (who came in our college for a guest lecture) that Bio Technology has now become so advanced that if we want to make an identical twin (or Genetical DNA Twin) of a ...
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Do epigenetics determine the proteins a cell produces and therefore it's function?

I'm having trouble understanding what epigenetics is in a simple sense. How I imagine it is that if we had 2 twins with identical DNA and we let them live we will see that they'll develop differently....
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How do scientists know what part of DNA does what?

There are many genetically engineered foods and animals and I was wondering, how do scientists know which part of a DNA to cut in order to produce the desired result. For example I want to make a ...
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what is allelic sequence variation?

When DNA polymorphism occurs mutations can take place. If these mutations occur in the germ cell and do not destroy its capability to reproduce, it is said that the mutation might move on to the next ...
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How do scientists transfer the specific DNA in Optogenetics?

I'm a bit new to genetic modification and I was wondering in Optogenetics (a field in neuroscience) how the scientists transfered the desired DNA strand from the light-sensitive ion channel opening ...
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Why are there inverted repeats in response elements?

The following picture shows an inverted repeat sequence in a response element. Response element sequences for glucocorticoids, estrogen, and thyroid hormone show that they all contain inverse repeats. ...
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How are elements like iron recognized and routed to the right places for use in the body?

I asked this in Chemistry and it was suggested to ask it here. I wondered how the genome, which afaik does not contain iron or calcium as "reference" copies, nonetheless produces an organism that uses ...
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Why replication collapse but not stall leads to DNA break?

I have been looking into the concept of replication dynamics and was wondering why collapsing but not stalling leads to a DNA break.
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Chromosome and chromatid numbers during cell cycle phases

A diploid cell in G1 has 6 chromosomes. How many chromosomes and how many chromatids are present in each of the following stages? Here is what I am guessing G1: 6 chromosomes ; 6 chromatids G2: 6 ...
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Are there interesting biomolecules consisting of chains of nucleotides that present multiple bond?

Watson-Crick bonds guanine-cytosine and adenine-thymine helically shape DNA. If I understand correctly, a sequence in only two of the nucleotides, for instance TGGTGTGGGTG ... would determine the dual ...
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Can a dividing cell that skipped DNA replication become cancerous?

Let's assume that a cell fails to replicate its DNA during the S Phase of the cell cycle. Let's also assume that the appropriate CDKs are inactive (perhaps due to mutation or lack of cyclin proteins ...
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Knockout and knockdown of gene

Out of curiosity, I got this question whether knocking out (deletion) of a gene on one side and knocking down (RNAi) of the same gene on the other side will affect the cell in a similar manner or not. ...
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Genes and Intelligence

Assuming that intelligence has a genetic component, • do we know which genes contribute to it? and, if so, • can we predict intelligence from genomic analysis?
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Name of dsRNA (or dsDNA) where all strands are identical

What is the name of dsRNA (or DNA) where all component strands are identical (i.e. where the complex consists of multiple copies of the same ssRNA)? Example: 2 identical ssRNAs forming a dsRNA ...
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How does the new discovery that mitochondrial dna is inherited from both parents change population genetics and other dates?

This new study seem to have pretty much proven that mtDNA is inherited from both parents. I assume that this would lead to most age estimates of ancient human ...
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Chemistry of phosphodiester bond formation by DNA polymerase

As I'm teaching General Biology to my college students, I realized that I don't fully understand how a 3-P nucleotide like ATP is broken down to be incorporated into DNA during replication. How does ...
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Is it possible to deduce facts about a person's parents just by studying his/her genome?

As an example, suppose Anne had abusive parents. Is it theoretically possible to deduce this from her genome even if she didn't inherit this quality (of being an abusive parent)?
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Computer Virus that infects DNA?

I have watched a talk by Mikko Hypponen (CEO of the security company F-Secure) called Silicon Plague. There, roughly at minute 51 of the talk, he mentions a computer code that is supposed to be able ...
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How does DNA code for the actual *shape* of individual body parts/areas (NOT segments or Hox genes)?

Just to save the trouble - I am not asking for general information on how DNA codes for proteins and definitely not how Hox genes work. I have a very good understanding of the evolutionary process and ...
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How much of my ancestry will match with my brother?

Recently, my brother (full sibling) got his ancestry checked from MyHeritageDNA. They have a similar service like 23 and me and I've found out that both companies are offering the basic service almost ...
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Offspring of parents with different number of chromosomes

Many papers report that dog-whelks (Nucella lapillus) show a distinct chromosomal polymorphism between populations of 2n = 24 up to 2n = 36. Could somebody please tell me how many chromosomes the F1 ...
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Linear and Circular DNA

So school has taught us that eukaryotes have DNA that is linear and inside of a membrane - called the nucleus. And that prokaryotes have circular DNA that is free floating inside of the cell. We ...
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Hydrophobic interactions in the helix-turn-helix

This slide states that the second helix works to stablize the configuration of the two helixes via hydrophobic interactions. What exactly is this hydrophobic interaction? In other words, what ...
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Can ribosomes read ssDNA?

My question is whether translation can be done, either naturally or artificially, through a ribosome reading (single-stranded) DNA directly. If not, I would like to know what allows ssRNA to be ...
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GC content of a protein-coding region

I have computer science background and I am trying to understand the equation below. The average value of the G + C content of a protein-coding region is given by : (G+C)= $\sum_{\alpha} (I_\alpha *...
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What makes/breaks the hydrogen bonds between DNA and RNA during transcription?

So I know that RNA polymerase catalyzes the phosphodiester bonds that hold the sugar backbones of a growing mRNA molecule together during transcription. However, I'm less sure about the hydrogen bonds ...
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Realistic Application of CRISPR in Human Disorders

Human trials recently began to use the genome editing technology CRISPR to treat sickle cell anemia using edited stem cells. Sickle cell anemia is caused by a single DNA Mutation, and is also a ...
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Is there a feasible way to create a large number of long random DNA strands?

Suppose I want to create a large number of random DNA strands (maybe a million, or a billion, or even something close to all $4^N$ possible sequences of $N$ base pairs). Is there an experimental way ...
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Which organisms have introns?

From Wikipedia: For example, introns are extremely common within the nuclear genome of higher vertebrates (e.g. humans and mice), where protein-coding genes almost always contain multiple introns, ...
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Why is thymine not incorporated into mRNA?

I am aware that in transcription uracil bonds to adenine and not thymine. But what is it that actually prevents thymine from bonding to adenine in transcription, that is not present in replication?
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Does every protein encoding gene necessarily have a transcription factor?

For instance, transcription factor gene A is responsible for activating gene B that encodes protein 1. However, it is possible for genes like gene B to encode proteins without having transcription ...