Questions tagged [dna]

Deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) is the carrier of genetic information, including for all known living organisms. The only known exceptions are RNA viruses.

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1answer
151 views

What does Δcys mean after a gene name?

I am reading a paper and I have come across the following statement: "Plasmids encoding full-length NCAM140 and NCAM140Δcys, intracellular domain of NCAM140, and the NCAM140ID729–750 fragment ...
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Meaning of 5’–3’ in relation to ORFs

I was reading a paper in the journal Molecular Basis of Disease, which stated: The ORFs are arranged as replicase, and protease and major S, E, M, and N proteins which follows a typical 5’—3’ order ...
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79 views

Which was the first DNA-based genome to be sequenced?

The Wikipedia article on phi X 174 states that: The phi X 174 (or φX174) bacteriophage is a single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) virus that infects Escherichia coli, and the first DNA-based genome to be ...
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Why is my DNA band bulging?

This is the only image my the TA was able to get for us. And, we're using it for our lab report. The image isn't even ours. It's another group's image that we're sharing. But I don't understand why in ...
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Do we come to know which allele is dominant by seeing family genration tree only?

I know that a Gene has Alleles (variation) and one is Dominant over Other i.e the Other Recessive. Then I got a Thought that How can we tell whether an Allele is Dominant or Recessive...... and I came ...
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How does the position of hydroxyl group in a nucleotide monomer affect the dehydration synthesis of nucleotides?

In dehydration synthesis of nucleotides, the hydrogen atom from the 3' carbon on the deoxyribose sugar of one nucleotide reacts with the hydroxyl group on the phosphate group of another nucleotide to ...
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Sequence of DNA

While giving an amateur reading to DNA. I was stuck within the first few lines: Refined resolution of the structure of DNA, based on X-ray crystallography of short synthetic pieces of DNA, has shown ...
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Why can DNA tests with mixed DNA of several people not be used to detect a criminal in a database?

Scenario: Two males attack another pair of two males with a weapon. The attackers are fought off and the weapon remains. Why does the police require DNA samples of the two who have been attacked to be ...
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Empirical Measurements of Barr Body Ratio

'Both X-chromosomes in a female have an equal chance of becomes a Barr body in each cell.' Every source I can find on Barr bodies claims this and I can think of no reason for why it may be wrong. What ...
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a biochemical pathway for evaluating the effect of 3' to 5' exonuclease on the proofreading activity of DNA synthesis

Can the following oversimplified biochemical pathway for DNA synthesis serve as a model for evaluating the degree of the effect that the 3' to 5' exonuclease affinity for mismatched base pairs can ...
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What would happen if we place denatured DNA in acidic medium?

DNA can be denatured at high temperatures or in alkaline solutions. But DNA can be annealed at low temperatures. I want to ask, could it be annealed in acidic medium?
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Why don't moles repair their DNA?

Cells have mechanism to repair damaged DNA. So why don't the cells in moles (the spots), repair themselves and the moles dissappear?
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DNA denaturation and Renaturation

If we denature dsDNA by heating it and then rapidly cooling it then what would happen? I read this question, where it was written that if we were given dsDNA sample which was completely denatured and ...
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Can the self correction mechanisms in cells imply that the DNA code to a degree is self modifying

There is an argument that proteins coded by 20 amino acids via the DNA program has so few successful protein formation that a search never can reach the complexity of it via natural selection and ...
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Why is the 5′ end of DNA a monophosphate?

According to my textbook: While the 5′ end of a DNA strand is typically a monophosphate, the 5′ end of an RNA molecule is typically a triphosphate. Source: Biology: How Life Works, 3rd Edition How ...
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Why do some karyotype graphs contain 46 pairs of chromosomes?

The human genome consists of 23 pairs of chromosomes. Two copies of each pair connect to each other at the centromere. Normal karyotype graphs should look like this: But some karyotype graphs contain ...
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How would one model a Neutrophil Extracellular Trap with Hookean Springs?

This is a question based in biology but involves a good amount of physics. Given that a Neutrophil Extracellular Trap (N.E.T) behaves like an aggregate of DNA strands with citrullinated Histones and ...
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1answer
65 views

Do DNA viroids exist?

Viroids are described as short circular ssRNA with no protein coating. Are there any analogous infectious particles that contain DNA instead of RNA? If DNA viroids do not exist, is there an obvious ...
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Does DNA being circular or linear directly affect the speed of DNA replication?

Let's say we have two DNA molecules of equal length, one belonging to a prokaryote and the other to an eukaryote. It's known that replication of the eukaryotic DNA is faster in this case. One clear ...
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What is the role of pyrophosphatase in RNA polymerization?

In Molecular Cell Biology (8th edition) there's a fragment in chapter 5.2 that says: The energetics of the polymerization reaction strongly favor the addition of ribonucleotides to the growing RNA ...
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What exactly is a DNA molecule? [duplicate]

Are the two strands of the double helix collectively called the DNA molecule, or is each individual strand the DNA molecule?
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Is the leading strand consistent in the same chromosome with multiple replication forks?

If a chromosome has multiple origins or replication, do those origins necessarily pick the same DNA strand as leading and the same one as lagging, or can they be of opposite orientations, sending ...
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State of extracted DNA

A well-known and commonly-done experiment is to extract DNA from strawberries or other fruit by first mashing the fruit of choice, adding the mush to a mixture of water, salt, and detergent, and then ...
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What is the copy number of a given gene in GRCh37?

sorry for the naive question, but how do I determine what the copy number is in GRCh37 for a gene with multiple CNVs? (e.g. DRD4).
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SNP Genotyping Scanning technology

The silicon bead micro-array technology for SNP scanning is a marvellous example of human ingenuity. Is anyone aware of a non-technical history of its development accessible to the lay reader? As an ...
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1answer
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Are there any DNA viruses with junk DNA in them?

I know mimiviruses and pandoraviruses have orphan DNA - DNA that is not found in other species - but this is DNA that codes for proteins. I am not able to find out if they contain junk DNA. By junk I ...
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How does the DNA cross through bacterial cell wall during electroporation?

There exists a lot of literature on electroporation of Gram-positive and negative bacteria. Most of it gives an explanation that electroporation works by creating transient pores in cell membranes of ...
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Origins of transcription factors and RNA Polymerase

I was learning about transcription factors and RNA polymerase from Khan Academy to supplement Dr. Robert Sapolsky's lectures on Human Behavioral Biology. As I understand: RNA Polymerase transcribes ...
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1answer
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Is this basic gene diagram correctly labeled?

I keep seeing this gene diagram, and I am not sure how to interpret it. I don't know what this diagram is called or where it was first depicted, but in the second picture, I have labeled it with what ...
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gene inversion and DNA directionality

The directionality of the DNA goes from the 3-prime end to the 5-prime end. Thus, the inversion of a gene would connect a 5-prime to a 5-prime. How could that be? Maybe inverting a gene also ...
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Universal clock for humans contained in the telomeric sequences?

I don't know if this would make sense, but imagine that we could only suffer from natural aging (not diseases whatsoever involved). Is there an estimate of what is our natural maximum lifespan that a ...
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Does using CRISPR/Cas9 knockout need to add donor DNA in the process?

I am new to this technology and don't quite understand how it works. Hope someone can give some suggestions! Thank you.
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What animal classes has also “Like Humans” XY Chromosomes for Males and XX for Females? [closed]

Are other mammals. birds, reptiles, or even insects same to humans in that the male organisms have XY Chromoson at the end and female XX? Thanks for the ansver
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Why does the structure of RNA change? [closed]

RNA only has one strand, but like DNA, is made up of nucleotides. RNA strands are shorter than DNA strands. RNA sometimes forms a secondary double helix structure, but only intermittently. Why does ...
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Can DNA rings, i.e. plasmids, form as Möbius strips?

I know that plasmids can be present in a coiled form, which keeps the DNA strands together when they degenerate, by forming catenases. I was wondering, however, whether it has been documented to ...
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Available Protein sequence alignment dataset and HMM model

I am new to biology and I find my algorithm may be used in the Protein sequence alignment, since it is a henced HMM model. I find that people use HMM to generate noisy copies of the consensus sequence ...
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1answer
79 views

Removing DNA from a cell

Stupid question perhaps but what does happen if one completely removes DNA from a single cell organism? As far as I know DNA is only needed for propagating information to descendants doing it's ...
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How can a homozygous mutation, considered pathogenic, occur on a gene such as HFE without the disease developing?

What happens when you have a homozygous mutation on a gene (eg. a swapped base), that is considered pathogenic, but without developing the disease? It it were a heterozygous mutation I would get it, ...
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DNA from sweat on the hat band? [closed]

My father died in 1987. I have an old cowboy hat of his. Can I use a FamilyTreeDNA test kit to recover any DNA?
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1answer
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Why do the calicheamicins bind to DNA at the minor, rather than the major, groove?

I am trying to understand why some drugs bind only to the minor groove and not to the major groove. More specifically, I am interested in calicheamicins. They target DNA and cause strand scission. ...
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Does the cell release the empty capsids?

The virus via the spike of the capsid connects to a receptor in a cell, then the DNA enters the cell wall. My question is what happens to the capsid - does it stay connected to the receptor or is ...
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1answer
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Can DNA be used directly to determine the age of a mutation?

I've studied that proteins found in a sample as biochemical evidences for evolution. Its variation in structure and configuration can be used to date the age when that mutation occured, effectively ...
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Are there any known consequences of the right-handedness of the DNA double helix?

In this article it is suggested (without evidence) that the right-handedness of DNA may be the cause that "kick[s] off asymmetry in the early embryo [of snails]". On the one hand we know that ...
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identificaation of the correct fragments with desired nucleotide sequences using probes

in making of rDNA, my text book has a point that is written above(the question). what i don't get is if we already know what the nucleotide sequence is why do we need to take out the gene having the ...
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1answer
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Does DNA have a phosphate group or phosphoric acid? [closed]

I am confused about the structure of nucleotide of a DNA. I have seen that it has a phosphate group(PO₄³⁻) in some books but phosphoric acid(H₃PO₄) in other ones. Which one is right?
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How does DNA shape a living organism? [closed]

I'm haven't studied biology so excuse me if I'm getting something wrong. I'm trying to understand how the DNA from a sperm and egg cause the egg too multiply and form a perticular shape (shape of a ...
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2answers
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How can DNA replication result in hair pin structures?

My professor said that one of the reasons SSB proteins are so important was to prevent the formation of hair pin structures, I can't see how or why DNA would form hairpin structures and there's not ...
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Self-study genetics

I'm new at the field of genomics. I'm a theoretical physicist by training and now we would like to translate some of the ideas to the DNA, possibly in real genomic instances. The concrete example ...
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Non-radioactive nucleotide labeling compatible with reverse transcriptase?

Are there any methods for nucleotide labeling which are compatible with use for reverse-transcription, besides radiolabeling, and for which the regulatory framework in the EU / USA are permissive ? ...
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Is it possible nowadays to artificially create an organism just by inserting organism's DNA into an artificial environment?

Let's say we have a DNA of a bacteria and we want to recreate the bacteria just from this DNA. Is it possible nowadays to get this DNA and insert it into some artificial solution so that from this DNA ...

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