Questions tagged [electrical-stimulation]

Electrical stimulation of the human body can be applied to restore bodily functions. Notable examples are auditory and visual prostheses to make the deaf hear and the blind see, and functional electrical stimulation to make the limp walk. It can be used for diagnosis (e.g., electromyography). Also, electrical stimulation can be used to treat (mental) illnesses (electrotherapy). Lastly, it can be the cause of injuries (e.g., due to a lightning strike).

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Stroke research question - has there been research in mirroring muscle electrical signals from a good limb to the bad one?

Transcutaneous electrical neural stimulation is an established tool to help stroke victims recover use of a paralyzed limb by engaging neuroplasticity. Has anyone here heard of research where you wear ...
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Would muscles still twitch if the applied potential is reversed?

In Galvani's experiment with frog legs, he applies an electric potential across the muscles of a frog which causes the leg muscles to contract. What would happen if the polarity was reversed (I do not ...
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how do we feel electricity on skin even though merkel cells are pressure sensitive only?

Note: Here I am not talking about electric shock (one feels when a lot of electricity passes through), I am talking about smaller sensations one feel directly on the skin. Note: I am not able to find ...
Aniket Rawat's user avatar
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What causes metallic tastes when you receive electric shocks

Whenever I receive small electric charges (most often by, e.g. touching the jack of a plugged in charging cable, or the casing of a charging Apple device), I experience a very distinctive taste in my ...
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How can I simulate heart electrical activity in a 2D plane?

I am not a biologist/medical student, I study software engineering. But I really like when medicine and engineering hold their hands together to achieve great things. As a side/toy project, I was ...
Pedro D.'s user avatar
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How are neurons selective towards specific stimuli?

I've read several papers that mention that there are specific neurons that are activated for specific things (e.g. neuron A activate only when horizontal lines appear, neuron B activate when certain ...
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Effect of opposing electric charges on cells

Is the affect on a cell between two negatively charged plates theoretically similar to between a positively and negatively charged plate? In other words, would it induce charges on the inside and ...
Tom's user avatar
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Help me understand voltage patch clamping

Before I type my question it is important to know that I already tried looking this up on my own and could not find an answer because the answers are all in complicated physics terms and this topic is ...
Alara's user avatar
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Are there any detrimental effects to long term electrical muscle stimulation?

I know that different types of electrical stimulation can be used in fields such as physical therapy to get muscles to contract. However, these electrical stimulation sessions are not prolonged and ...
3michelin's user avatar
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Neuron stimulation experiments

Has anyone extracted a class of neurons (or a connected set of neurons) and stimulated them electrically to get an understanding of their behavior? If so, could someone point me to papers along these ...
Opt's user avatar
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Is there a physiological reason why direct lightning strikes are not lethal for everyone or does it all come down to dumb luck?

Some people who get directly struck by lightning and some more than once (starts at 00:25) survive while others die instantly or later on due to complications/injuries. Looking at a wiki page for ...
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How is the electrical potential difference distributed between two stimulating electrodes?

Suppose I set the voltage value of an isolated stimulator with a floating ground. I place one electrode above the spinal cord (positive) and the other placed subcutaneously far away from the spinal ...
user48114's user avatar
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What are ECT parameters?

ECT or shock treatment is used to treat psychological disorders. How much voltage, current and duration is used for this? Wikipedia mentions a treatment of 0.8 Ampere for 5 seconds.
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What is the death mechanism of an electrocuted Mosquito?

While using the Electric bat, does the mosquito get killed by primary electrocution, or it secondarily by burning?
Shahriar Mahmud's user avatar
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Can anyone explain the idea of anodic nerve stimulation?

Nerves get stimulated under the cathode, according to the conventional current direction. But in some research, it is said that anodic stimulation or anodic current stimulation can activate neurons. ...
Arnab Paul's user avatar
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Can neurons be inhibited with electric current?

It is well known the electricity can be used to fire neurons. But can it be used to inhibit neuronal firing? This is in the context of extracellular stimulation. In extracellular stimulation, it is ...
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Spatiotemporal patterns in neural networks

It turns out that my work in nonlinear dynamics directly maps to a close variant of the Integrate and Fire model. My model produces spatiotemporal patterns that resemble foam. I have to stress that ...
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Control of neural systems [closed]

It turns out that my work in nonlinear dynamics directly maps to Integrate and Fire models and could even provide a new way to control them (manipulate the firing rates). However, it is unclear to me ...
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How much current various kind of body tissues can tolerate without any serious damage? [closed]

Human body can tolerate some amount of current. How much current (and duration) various kind of body tissues can tolerate without any serious damage?
wgc's user avatar
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Organic battery?

Similar to the Matrix movie where humans were used as a source of electricity but different by using electric eels. Farmed like tuna what would be the electricity exchange to the food they eat?
Muze's user avatar
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Why does an electric shock contract the muscle?

From what I understand, the electrical impulse in our nerve cells is not made of electrons, but of ions that move from different environments with different concentrations, which is totally not ...
gigie's user avatar
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1 answer
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Can we taste electrons?

Why does licking a 9-Volt battery elicits a taste sensation? Can taste be stimulated by electrical stimulation?
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How does current delivered by a neural stimulator propagate in the brain?

I have been trying to find good literature on how a stimulus current propagates through a medium that contains both gray and white matter (like the brain). Is it safe to assume that a current will ...
Moppentapper's user avatar
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Why is stimulation of nerve tissue with a negative pulse called "cathodic" stimulation?

By definition, the cathode is defined as the terminal through which current exits a polarized device. But in the context of neuromodulation, such as spinal cord stimulation, deep brain stimulation, ...
Moppentapper's user avatar
2 votes
1 answer
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What dangers would the wireless transmission of power through microwaves pose to living organisms?

If we were one day able to harness the power of "wireless electricity", and INTEGRATE it into society, what disadvantages and/or dangers to living organisms would become relevant at that point? To my ...
marcbally's user avatar
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Electrically facilitated active transport across a membrane

I'm trying to go back to school to do a PhD in control theory, specifically concerned with control of glucose. The glucose system can be controlled using two chemicals: insulin and glucagon. I was ...
ijustlovemath's user avatar
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3 answers
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Why can humans feel electricity?

What evolutionary process has provided humans with the ability of feeling electric current? Besides lightning and electric eel, what natural hazards include electricity that poses a threat to humans?
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2 answers
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How to make a fake auditory signal?

My question is about making fake auditory signals. The ear collects sounds from the environment, which are transformed into a neural signal by the hair cells in the inner ear. This signal is sent ...
Nimda's user avatar
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How can electric fields inhibit tumor growth?

In MIT's Technology review it is explained that electric fields can cause dividing cancer cells to explode, while these fields have no significant impact on non-dividing tissues. The original research ...
Kevin Kostlan's user avatar
30 votes
2 answers
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Why does an electrical shock freeze up muscles?

Why is it when someone comes into contact with an electrical supply that their body freezes up and is unable to move away from the electrical source? Can someone explain this through a physiological ...
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