Questions tagged [endocrinology]

The area of physiology dealing with the production and effects of hormones.

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4answers
391 views

Is Thyroxine a hormone?

I have read the phrase 'T3 is three to four times more potent than T4' several times both in books and websites. But isn't T4 a prohormone of T3? Why do then these sources talk about its potency as a ...
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1answer
1k views

Are glands in human made up of muscles?

I came across this idea while reading an excerpt of my textbook $-$ Muscles move eye lid , tongue, beat the heart, popel food through gut, discharge wastes, squeeze out secretion from the glands ...
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Can human be emotionless?

Is it possible that a person can't produce, like, dopamine, serotonin, and other emotion hormones? Or, a part of the brain can't function to make one feel something?
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1answer
652 views

Role of the Hypothalmus in the control of Blood Sugar

In homeostatic regulation of blood glucose, the receptor and effector is the Pancreas, but how does the control centre — the Hypothalamus — connect and link into this process?
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1answer
276 views

How are constitutive enzymes regulated?

I found that inducible enzymes can be regulated by many ways, but I cannot find how constitutive enzymes are regulated...
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1answer
821 views

What was the precursor of testosterone? [closed]

Testosterone evolved about 500 million years ago (says 8fact.com). What was the precursor of testosterone (if any)? If possible, what caused the 'precursor' to evolve?
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1answer
101 views

How is oxytocin produced?

Is oxytocin (or other peptide hormones) produced from a gene through translation, or is it made some other way?
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2answers
2k views

After hysterectomy does FSH secretion stop?

This question came in an exam, and my reference book says yes, it does. But it hasn't explained why. If the ovaries are also removed, then the menstrual cycle should stop. In absence of hormones ...
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1answer
587 views

Thyroid hormone metabolism and excretion

My understanding is that hormones generated by the thyroid gland, including, for example, T4, are excreted and recirculated in the body through the digestive tract. The reason for thinking this is ...
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1answer
759 views

What is the effect of TSH on the calcitonin?

I know that TSH is released from the pituitary gland and it motivates the thyroid gland to release thyroxine, and calcitonin is released when the calcium level is high in the blood, but is calcitonin ...
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1answer
352 views

Freestyle Libre's Glucose's Specificity and Accuracy?

I am studying the Continuous Glucose Monitoring devices i.e. glucose sensors with continuous monitoring. Here one good presentation about the topic. They are considering interstitial fluid in their ...
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1answer
4k views

What will happen when humans are injected with plant growth hormones

Will plant growth hormones (PGHs), (let us consider auxins for example) poison our body or not? I do realise that when you eat a shoot, auxins get digested and are less likely to be poisonous but when ...
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1answer
2k views

Does TSH and Growth hormone have any role in menstruation?

Actually, I came across this on a mcq (multiple choice question) exam: Name the hormone which has no role in menstruation: A. LH B. FSH C. GH D. TSH (only 1 correct option) Both FSH and LH have ...
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26 views

Glycoprotein hormones metabolism

Why do the carbohydrate groups in glycoprotein hormones decrease the rate of metabolism? And increase the half-life?
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1answer
2k views

Difference between LH and ICSH

Are Luteinizing hormone and Interstitial Cell Stimulating Hormone(ICSH) the same?
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1answer
4k views

Can a hormone be absorbed into the body digestively?

Obviously, to act most hormones must be present in the bloodstream. What happens if a hormone or hormone-containing food is consumed normally? Is there any way for the hormone to reach the bloodstream?...
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1answer
818 views

Could a trans-female person ever become pregnant?

I was told that a transgender person, which I will define as anyone assigned male or female at birth that identifies opposite to that assignment, could never become pregnant conceptually, due to the ...
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1answer
428 views

Are there testosterone receptors in female mammary tissue?

Does female mammary tissue have receptors for testosterone hormones? Do male hormones influence female mammary glands, as female hormones influenced the male mammary tissue, such as in gynecomastia?
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0answers
38 views

Does physical exercise of a specific part affect muscles in the other parts of the body?

There is a theory among bodybuilders, that is, if you train big muscle groups (e.g. legs, chest), it will increase the overall growth of muscles all over the body; the trained muscle will release ...
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1answer
237 views

How may the age of a child be estimated when required to do so, in video-graphic evidence?

How may it be possible to roughly conclude that a subject in a select piece of video-graphic evidence presented, is in fact a child, i.e. without the subject being, physically examined? Is it ...
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1answer
619 views

How to measure GnRH in menstrual cycle?

I am interested in pulse frequencies of GnRH (gonadotropin-releasing hormone) in the menstrual cycle (MC) i.e. 28 +/- 7 days. I would like to study its pulsatile nature i.e. within one MC, not same ...
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1answer
365 views

Where exactly is 'Colloid' with regards to synthesis of thyroid hormones?

I've researched colloid and it seems to be a substance of microfibres and thin films in which thyroid hormones may be synthesised, but I was wondering where this exactly is... I think it could be in ...
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1answer
578 views

Corpus luteum during the luteal phase and gonadotropins

Does the corpus luteum operate independently of the hypothalamic-hypophyseal-ovarian axis? I know that hCG sustains the corpus luteum in the absence of FSH and LH, but in an ovarian cycle where there ...
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1answer
161 views

How can hyperthyroidism induce osteoporosis?

It says in my physiology notes that hyperthyroidism can cause osteoporosis. I've been trying to figure out how this could be possible for a little more than an hour now. Every article that I look at ...
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1answer
2k views

How does the pancreatic beta-cell know how much insulin to secrete in response to glucose?

How do $\ce\beta$-cells know how much glucose is in the blood? I know that when glucose enters a beta cell it triggers the cell to produce insulin. $\ce\beta$-cells trap glucose by converting it into ...
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2answers
3k views

Target cells of adrenaline?

I have been thinking about how adrenaline increases blood sugar levels, but have not been able to find an answer to the target cells. Does it affect the hepatocytes and muscle cells, like glycogen? ...
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0answers
129 views

Nail polish toxicity studies?

Are there any well-founded studies that authoritatively demonstrate negative effects from the use of nail polish, particularly in children? I've been brought into the fray of a couple of folks who ...
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1answer
746 views

If so many different hormones/molecules work by activating adenylyl cyclase, how do they have different effects?

It seems that many hormones and molecules work by activating adenylyl cyclase to convert $\text{ATP}$ to $\text{cAMP}$, such as adrenaline and glucagon. Both of these seem to bind to $\text G$ protein ...
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1answer
979 views

Effects of HRT on transgender(M to F) physiology and athleticism.

I often heard of athletes in the Olympics who would be accussed of having an advantage because they were intersexed. Now I know transgenderism and being intersexed are not the same thing, but they ...
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1answer
2k views

How is adrenaline (also known as “epinephrine”) a ligand?

I keep reading that adrenaline is a ligand, however, from what I understand a ligand is a molecule or ion which donates a pair of electrons to a central transition metal ion in a complex. If this is ...
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1answer
398 views

Difference between the inactivation of neurotransmitters and hormones

Neurotransmitters must be somehow removed from the synapse once they’ve produced a post-synaptic potential, whether it be through enzymatic breakdown, diffusion, reuptake or another mechanism. However,...
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2answers
7k views

Why would glucocorticoids promote glycogenesis and not glycogenolysis?

I read in a textbook that glucocorticoids can stimulate the synthesis of glycogen. I do not understand this at all—shouldn’t glucocorticoids try to increase the blood level of glucose? Why would they ...
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1answer
349 views

Why would growth hormone (somatotropin) cause both lipid AND glucose release?

GH increases lipolysis (lipid breakdown) and the release of fatty acids from adipocytes into the blood. Fatty acids then can be used as energy sources to drive chemical reactions, including ...
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0answers
570 views

Proteases in the blood

I’m reading on hormones and the book talks about how peptide or amine hormones are easily broken down by proteases present in the blood plasma. This has led me to question the interactions between ...
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56 views

How are steroid hormones secreted? [closed]

Peptide hormones for example tend to be secreted by Ca2+ mediated exocytosis following depolarisation and are secreted in vesicles. How are steroid hormones secreted and what stimulates their ...
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2answers
6k views

Why does depolarisation by high intracellular K+ trigger calcium channels opening?

I have learnt that in pancreatic beta cells, glucose being metabolised in the cell causes a high ATP level, which triggers ATP-dependent potassium channels to close. This means that potassium can't ...
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1answer
187 views

Is there a blood panel lab test that measures all the hormone-producing glands?

I understand that there are gland-specific hormone tests, such as: Secretin: for the pancreas; and Prolactin/ACTH: for the pituitary; and PTH: for the payathyroid, etc. However, are there any "...
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1answer
293 views

Does exercise really reduce stress in the biological meaning?

It is a very widespread claim, that movement in general helps body to get out stress hormones. It is used as a warning for long sitting at the computer and I also heard it as a pro-vegan argument (We ...
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3answers
15k views

What are the differences between how glucagon and cortisol work to increase blood sugar?

As I understand, both cortisol and glucagon cause an increase in blood sugar concentrations. However I don't understand how they work differently or why they work separately. I would be very grateful ...
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1answer
82 views

Artificial Adrenalin

I was watching Sherlock Holmes - A Game of Shadows yesterday. I saw that he had developed a serum that causes a person to react like he has been injected with adrenalin. Watsons's dog fainted, I ...
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1answer
4k views

If a human is stranded with beer but no water, should they drink it? [duplicate]

TL;DR: At what percent (if any) will alcohol dehydrate you more/faster than drinking nothing? Let's contrive a situation for dramatic effect... A human goes out on a boat for a nice sail in the sea. ...
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125 views

Root etiology of non-pituitary low T4 and low TSH

Please note: I'd like to preface this question by stating that this is neither homework nor me seeking medical advice. I am simply trying to understand the biological, physiological root etiology ...
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1answer
4k views

What is the antagonist of epinephrine?

Norepinephrine and epinephrine have similar stimulant properties on the nervous system and the body. I was wondering which hormone is the antagonist of epinephrine?
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1answer
411 views

How do signal transduction pathways utilize transcription factors to express a specific gene?

I have an inquiry regarding the regulation of genes via extracellular signaling. To my knowledge, in autocrine, paracrine, and endocrine cellular communication, large protein ligands that cannot ...
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0answers
846 views

What's the feedback regulation of Thyroid diseases and body temperature?

While going through the feedback regulation, the control of blood glucose level by insulin and glucagon is quite discussed in multiple materials including the textbook. I also understand the basic ...
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1answer
249 views

What is basis of multifunctionality of “master glands” in the endocrine system?

I have just started reading about the endocrine system and I am having some difficulty understanding the basis of distribution of glands and associated hormones. I am using multifuntionality to ...
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3answers
30k views

Why does the face turn pale in dangerous situations?

I know what the effects are of a dangerous situation on the brain, i.e., an activation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis which eventually results in an increased heart rate and elevated ...
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1answer
9k views

How do female hormones cause blood to clot?

On most female-hormone supplements you get a warning that is something like this: The use of a combination hormonal contraceptives (CHC), like NuvaRing, is associated with increased risks of ...
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2answers
277 views

Leptin and fat mass?

I am interested in the relationship between blood leptin concentration and fat mass. It is well known that as fat mass increases, leptin increases. Have there been studies that look into whether the ...
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1answer
777 views

Can androgen-insensitive genetic-males get pregnant?

According to the linked report, people with androgen insensitivity syndrome appear as male, but have both feminine and masculine outer genitalia. However, I was not able to find out whether their ...