Questions tagged [evolution]

Changes in the heritable attributes of populations of organisms over time. The mechanisms of evolution are mutation, migration, drift, and selection.

Filter by
Sorted by
Tagged with
0
votes
0answers
12 views

Reasons for the existence of symporters and antiporters

I'm wondering what is an evolutionary adaptation to the evolution of symporters and antiporters instead of just uniporters. Antiporters might help preserve electrical neutrality by pumping in/out an ...
3
votes
2answers
251 views

Human ancestor reproduction after chromosome fusion

I read somewhere that human chromosome 2 is the result of 2 primate chromosomes fusing together somewhere along our evolutionary journey. This is why we have 23 chromosomes while other primates have ...
-1
votes
0answers
27 views

Why did Black and White Rhino evolve into having relatively poor eyesight? [duplicate]

It is well documented that Black and White Rhino have relatively poor eyesight (compared to humans and many other animals). I have heard anecdotally that their poor eyesight could be due to Rhinos not ...
0
votes
1answer
4k views

Hardy-Weinberg sex linked formula

The "big five" assumptions are the ones listed in the main text. However, the basic formulation of Hardy-Weinberg equilibrium also relies on a few other assumptions; Allele and genotype frequencies ...
2
votes
0answers
44 views

Are dark skinned natives of Central America dark skinned due to the same genes as people of African heritage?

I'm trying to understand how strong the evolutionary pressure on genes for skin color happens to be. Was it fast enough that the humans that migrated through the Bering Strait had lighter skin color ...
1
vote
0answers
33 views

Do sharks possess a more hydrodynamical shape than dolphins? [closed]

I do not study biology at all. Is it known if sharks who evolved over milion of years have more hydrodynamical shape than say e.g. dolphins who evolved for much shorter time. It probably depends on ...
0
votes
2answers
123 views

ELI5 what is true breeding?

In "Variation under Domestication", Darwin makes several references to the concept of true breeding: They believe that every race which breeds true, let the distinctive characters be ever so slight,...
-3
votes
0answers
45 views

Is the phrase “survival of the fittest” accurate? What are the other factors in the natural selection beside survive?

According to Wikipedia: While the phrase "survival of the fittest" is often used to mean "natural selection", it is avoided by modern biologists, because the phrase can be ...
-1
votes
1answer
44 views

Visualizing selection's effect on a population with a fitness landscape in R

I'm trying to write a script to demonstrate the effect of selection in a population. The problem that I have is that it is not realistic in the sense that not only the mean would change for ...
15
votes
3answers
591 views

Why is venom more common in fish and snakes than other vertebrates?

Reading this question, I wondered why is it that we associate vertebrate venoms so often with snakes and fish, and more rarely with lizards, amphibians, mammals, and birds (apparently never, in birds?)...
33
votes
7answers
19k views

Why are not all species hermaphrodites?

If a hermaphrodite animal (like slug, snail, etc) finds a partner they can mate immediately. If another animal with "normal" reproduction (lets say a mouse) finds a partner they can only mate if they ...
1
vote
2answers
27 views

Are SNPs or SSR copy number variation mutations more prominent?

I'm trying to get a sense of the dominant way that mutations occur. I have seen various numbers which seem at least at first glance to conflict, and I was curious if anyone had clarification on this. ...
0
votes
0answers
31 views

What are evolutionary reasons for humans' limited regeneration abilities? [duplicate]

As far as I understand (I am not a biologist), a ability of a species arises during the evolution if: It increases reproduction chances It is not too energy expensive It is physically possible At ...
4
votes
1answer
134 views

What is the most recent well-attested common ancestor of chimpanzees and humans?

Humans and chimpanzees are related and thus have a most recent common ancestor. Of course pinning down this precise point is essentially impossible, so I'm interested in close ancestors of this most ...
1
vote
1answer
85 views

Balancing selection vs introgression?

Balancing selection can maintain polymorphisms in natural populations for extended periods of evolutionary time. However, in this paper, Dannemann et al. 2016 identify three archaic haplotypes in the ...
9
votes
7answers
3k views

Relationship Between Evolution and the Increase of Entropy of Earth

I was confronted by this question: Biological evolution of life on Earth, from simple prokaryote-like cells to large, multicellar eukaryotic organisms, A) has occurred in accordance with the laws of ...
0
votes
1answer
46 views

Does mitochondrial eve have to exist?

Suppose we took all living humans and found the set of their mothers, mothers' mothers, etc. and then traced down as far as possible. Is there a logical reason that this tree has to converge to one '...
3
votes
1answer
806 views

What does the 4DTv (four-fold synonymous) mean?

I saw this sentence "4DTv is the transversion rate at fourfold synonymous codon positions, and ranged from zero (for recently duplicated paralogs) to ~0.5 (for paralogs derived from an ancient ...
2
votes
2answers
57 views

What was the evolutionary advantage of having seeds so large that they could only be dispersed by megafauna?

I understand that fruits like the avocado and the osange orange are so large and unwieldy that their evolutionary "intent" was to be consumed whole by megafauna that are now extinct. What I ...
3
votes
1answer
53 views

Can hunting of large specimens of a species make the size and weight of the species tend to be smaller?

Siberian tigers in the wild don't grow as much as they used to be in past (in the 1900s). Their average weight was measured 176 kg in 2005 study. But it was also said that those tigers observed in ...
0
votes
0answers
29 views

Is there “stem” organelles in plant meristems?

Two cytoplasmic genomes exist in plant in addition to the nuclear one. As far as I understand, they divide more or less during the entire life of the plant along with cell proliferation/growth in ...
0
votes
1answer
49 views

Mathematical/statistical models for forecasting population distributions of age, sex, weight, and height [closed]

I come from a mathematical background but I have no experience with the topic of mathematical biology. Are there well established mathematical/statistical models for forecasting the evolution of ...
3
votes
2answers
89 views

Does a virus that spreads more rapidly have less chance to evolve?

Now that the COVID-19 pandemic has been going on for a while, there are reports of many new variants, which have presumably arisen in the past year through mutation and spread through natural ...
8
votes
1answer
1k views

Why are eggs “egg” shaped?

Is there a reason as to why chickens lay "egg" shaped eggs, as opposed to spherically shaped eggs (or a random shape)? For extra points: why do plant seeds often come in this same "egg&...
5
votes
1answer
101 views

Inheritance percentiles

I am aware that the average DNA contribution from each grandparent is 25%, while the possible range is 0%-50%. I found a source citing 18%-32% as the "normal" range but this was undefined. I assume ...
-1
votes
2answers
72 views

How do microbes spread from a small place to a very large place?

Bacteria are very small, so they cannot move very far on their own. Viruses cannot move themselves at all. So how does a specific type of bacteria or virus spread from a small place to a very large ...
4
votes
0answers
46 views

Caloric Mimicry

Was thinking about natural "zero calorie" sweetness and how these compounds could come to be via evolution. I was specifically thinking about monk fruit. While artificial selection likely ...
3
votes
1answer
73 views

Could an organism evolve to adaptively evolve?

Besides chance mutations sticking around because of their utility towards survival and procreation, could an organism evolve the ability to aid this process by mutating more frequently in beneficial ...
2
votes
3answers
106 views

Which fish did modern tetrapods descend from?

Did modern tetrapods descend from Tiktaalik or Ichthyostega? While I understand that in terms of all tetrapods, the lineages of Tiktaalik and Ichthyostega both would be included, but I want to know if ...
0
votes
2answers
143 views

When is it better for a gene to cause a biased sex ratio?

Because genes are selfish and want to maximise their transmission from generation to generation, if they can distort a population's sex ratio, isn't it always in their interest to cause a biased sex ...
2
votes
2answers
223 views

Is the suicide of a moribund individual to be considered group selection?

When a moribund individual commits suicide (e.g., Refardt, Bergmiller & Kummerli, 2013; http://rspb.royalsocietypublishing.org/content/royprsb/280/1759/20123035.full.pdf), is this to be considered ...
-1
votes
1answer
232 views

What function does a mane serve in animals that possess it?

Horses, Donkeys, Antilopes and Bovines grow masses of hair on top (and sometimes below) the neck. What function does it serve? Is that to hinder predators biting?
0
votes
0answers
17 views

How can normalizing selection (stabilizing selection) be involved in speciation?

In Mayr's book What Evolution Is, he discusses about normalizing selection in rapidly evolving lineages. "However, normalizing selection is equally active in rapidly evolving lineages." ...
0
votes
0answers
101 views

Does parental conflict lead to genes combining important functions with functions only advantageous for one of the parents?

In a sitation of a mother-father conflict of interests, the mother might use epigenetics to turn off some genes only advantageous for the father's genes and not her own. I thought a logical father's ...
0
votes
0answers
32 views

Which eukaryotic species had evolved the most after losing ability of sexual reproduction?

It seems sexual reproduction is ubiquitous in eukaryotes, so it is important despite needing excessive resources spent. It is an evolutionary adaptation for better evolution. Still, there are species ...
0
votes
1answer
64 views

Are there any species whose descendants can meet their ancestors from 100 generations back?

I.e. Humans can sometimes meet even their great-great-grandparents, but are there any species that can be alive at the same time as their great-great-……-great-grandparents? I imagine it would be those ...
0
votes
1answer
97 views

Can a trait be too successful? Wouldn't overwhelmingly successful traits limit variability, which is one of the requirements of NS? [closed]

Can a trait be too successful? Wouldn't an overwhelmingly successful trait soon limit the gene pool, and if so, how would the process of natural selection react to that? If an individual is born ...
3
votes
1answer
2k views

Why does the Vas Deferens detour over the pubic bone?

I was surprised to learn that the vas deferens detours over the pubic bone instead of taking the obviously more direct path. https://human.biodigital.com/widget?be=u1P&uaid=1ly5V Because I would ...
4
votes
1answer
293 views

Why are mules/donkeys aggressive when faced with predators but horses are not?

I came upon an interesting quote after going down the rabbit hole on a variety of subjects. While deep in the data, I came upon this quote oat and farm animal owners likes to have mules with their ...
2
votes
2answers
3k views

What is the relationship between radiation and evolution?

There is always a certain amount of background radiation present, for example due to ionizing radiation from the sun and other stars. Also certain materials like granite may emit relatively large ...
0
votes
1answer
74 views

Are genetic crosses between asexual organisms possible?

To my knowledge (Please correct me if I am wrong), genetic basis is the key in defining species. When we encounter an unknown species, we can sequence it's genome and compare the genome with other ...
1
vote
3answers
183 views

What is the evolutionary advantage with two lungs (kidneys)? [closed]

What is the evolutionary advantage with two lungs (kidneys)? Most living beings only have one heart, one stomach. Most internal organs are not doubled and if one lung fails it is not exactly quite ...
-1
votes
4answers
76 views

Have we reached the technology to 'drive' evolution artifically?

Previously our evolution was due to circumstance, we can trace back all our body features to overcome some 'challenge' our ancestors were faced with. Now, in the modern time, with that large ...
-1
votes
1answer
64 views

What's the survival benefit of blue plants?

I'm working on a science-fiction worldbuilding setting and have been trying to find out what the survival benefits are of blue in plants, like this or this. I have researched this but most of the ...
2
votes
1answer
123 views

Why are some organisms able to regenerate?

Why can sponges, cnidarian polyps and planaria regenerate if broken up, but other animals e.g. humans and phylum chordata cannot?
1
vote
3answers
259 views

Evolution: Can the genotype frequencies change, but the allele frequencies remain constant?

If a population isn't evolving because it's in Hardy-Weinberg (HW) equilibrium, then I know that both genotype and allele frequencies must stay constant. My question is, can evolution still not occur ...
2
votes
2answers
3k views

Why aren't there any transitional animals today?

You have probably heard this question before and in different formats. Usually, it is used as a "proof" to disprove the theory of evolution. I understand that the apes we descended from are ...
4
votes
2answers
1k views

Is it possible there were multiple origins of life? And, if so, why did the one which became the common ancestor between all organisms prevail?

I have learned that all currently-living organisms come from a common ancestor, which I theoretically understand. However, my professor in a class mentioned that there is a chance that there were ...
0
votes
1answer
46 views

Common ancestry of our cells to the first unicellular cell

If we start the chapter of life with low fidelity self replicating RNAs forming exactly identical copies of themselves, which then later evolved to form the first primordial basic cells which further ...

1
2 3 4 5
42